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The Effect of Nimodipine on Outcome After Head Injury: A Prospective Randomised Control Trial

  • G. Teasdale
  • I. Bailey
  • A. Bell
  • J. Gray
  • R. Gullan
  • U. Heiskanan
  • P. V. Marks
  • H. Marsh
  • A. D. Mendelow
  • G. Murray
  • J. Ohman
  • G. Quaghebeur
  • J. Sinar
  • A. Skene
  • A. Waters
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

To study the effect of nimodipine on the outcome of head injury, three hundred and fifty-two patients who were not obeying commands were randomised to placebo or nimodipine (2 mg per hour intravenously for 7 days). The 2 groups were well matched for important prognostic features. Six months after injury, more of the patients who were given nimodipine had a favourable outcome (moderate/good recovery) than in the control group, but the increase in favourable outcome (8%) was not significant statistically.

Keywords

Head Injury Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Glasgow Outcome Scale Prospective Randomise Control Trial Head Injured Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Teasdale
    • 1
  • I. Bailey
    • 2
  • A. Bell
    • 3
  • J. Gray
    • 2
  • R. Gullan
    • 4
  • U. Heiskanan
    • 5
  • P. V. Marks
    • 6
  • H. Marsh
    • 3
  • A. D. Mendelow
    • 7
  • G. Murray
    • 8
  • J. Ohman
    • 5
  • G. Quaghebeur
    • 4
  • J. Sinar
    • 7
  • A. Skene
    • 9
  • A. Waters
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Neurological SciencesThe Southern General HospitalGlasgowScotland
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryRoyal Victoria HospitalBelfastUK
  3. 3.Department of NeurosurgeryAtkinson Morley’s HospitalLondonUK
  4. 4.Regional Neurosurgical UnitBrook General HospitalLondonUK
  5. 5.University of HelsinkiFinland
  6. 6.Department of NeurosurgeryAddenbrooke’s HospitalCambridgeUK
  7. 7.Department of NeurosurgeryRegional Neurological CentreNewcastle Upon TyneUK
  8. 8.Department of SurgeryWestern InfirmaryGlasgowUK
  9. 9.Clinical Trial Data CentreUniversity of NottinghamUK

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