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Hemispheric CBF-Alterations in the Time Course of Focal and Diffuse Brain Injury

  • J. Meixensberger
  • A. Brawanski
  • M. Holzschuh
  • W. Ullrich
  • I. Danhauser-Leistner
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Hemispheric CBF-alterations were studied in the time course of focal and diffuse brain injury in a series of 25 head injured patients. Repeated 133 Xe CBF measurements with a mobile 10 detector system were performed in order to evaluate hemispheric CBF and cerebral vasoreactivity after change of PaCO2. Focal brain injury influenced hemispheric CBF varying in the time course: A hyperperfusion could be found within the first seven days after injury in 55 percent, whereas a hypoperfusion could be detected during the whole examination period in 18 percent. In diffuse injury we never saw such CBF abnormalities. On the other hand hemispheric CO2-reactivity was disturbed in focal and diffuse lesions, whereas a correlation between altered CBF at rest and CO2-reactivity could be only detected in 40% in focal injury. This investigations demonstrates no significant general, however, a partial influence of morphological damage upon cerebral microcirculation.

Keywords

Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Head Injured Patient Diffuse Lesion Cerebral Microcirculation Interhemispheric Difference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Meixensberger
    • 2
  • A. Brawanski
    • 1
  • M. Holzschuh
    • 1
  • W. Ullrich
    • 1
  • I. Danhauser-Leistner
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity of WürzburgFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Neurochirurgische Klinik und PoliklinikUniversität WürzburgWürzburgFederal Republic of Germany
  3. 3.Department of AnaesthesiologyUniversity of WürzburgFederal Republic of Germany

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