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Clinical, biochemical and psychometric findings with the new MAO-A-inhibitors moclobemide and brofaromine in patients with major depressive disorder

  • G. Laux
  • W. Classen
  • E. Sofic
  • T. Becker
  • P. Riederer
  • K. P. Lesch
  • M. Struck
  • H. Beckmann
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 32)

Summary

N = 53 inpatients with major depressive disorder have been treated with the reversible, selective MAO-A-inhibitors moclobemide (double-blind versus maprotiline) and brofaromine (open study), respectively. Clinically, significant improvement of depression and an activating profile of action could be observed, typical side effects were sleep disturbances, agitation and weight loss. The neurobiochemical data showed an increase of noradrenaline plasma concentrations under treatment with moclobemide. Visual reaction times improved with antidepressant treatment. MAO-A inhibitors proved to be effective antidepressants in the treatment of hospitalized patients with predominantly endogenous depressions.

Keywords

Major Depressive Disorder Clinical Global Impression Vanillic Acid Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Hamilton Rate Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Laux
    • 1
  • W. Classen
    • 1
  • E. Sofic
    • 1
  • T. Becker
    • 1
  • P. Riederer
    • 1
  • K. P. Lesch
    • 1
  • M. Struck
    • 1
  • H. Beckmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of WürzburgWürzburgFederal Republic of Germany

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