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MAO activity, metabolism and anticonvulsant activity of milacemide in rats and mice

  • M. Colombo
  • M. Strolin Benedetti
  • A. Bonsignori
  • G. Cocchiara
  • R. Roncucci
  • P. Dostert
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 32)

Summary

Milacemide was found to protect Swiss albino CD1 mice but not Sprague Dawley rats against bicuculline-induced lethality. Since it had been previously suggested that the anticonvulsant activity of milacemide might be related to MAO-B- mediated glycine formation, brain and liver MAO-A and-B activities and the urinary metabolic pattern of milacemide were determined in the same mice and rat strains. Similar brain and liver MAO activities were found in the two species, except for liver MAO-A activity which was higher in rats. After the same oral dose of milacemide, the percent of the dose excreted as glycinamide was significantly higher in mice than in rats, whereas that excreted as metabolite UK1 was significantly higher in rats. These results support the hypothesis of a glycine-mediated anticonvulsant activity for milacemide and suggest that the increased formation of UK1 to the detriment of glycinamide might account for the lack of protection against bicuculline-induced lethality by milacemide in rats.

Keywords

Anticonvulsant Activity Synaptosomal Fraction Tonic Convulsion Final Specific Activity Brain Monoamine Oxidase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Colombo
    • 1
  • M. Strolin Benedetti
    • 1
  • A. Bonsignori
    • 1
  • G. Cocchiara
    • 1
  • R. Roncucci
    • 1
  • P. Dostert
    • 1
  1. 1.Research and Development — Erbamont GroupFarmitalia Carlo ErbaMilanItaly

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