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Early markers in Parkinson’s disease

  • H. Przuntek
Part of the New Vistas in Drug Research book series (DRUG RESEARCH, volume 1)

Summary

None of the instrumental met hods used for the detection of Parkinson’s disease, including biochemical tests and imaging techniques, have sufficiently been proved to be more reliable than clinical methods in terms of accuracy and specificity.

Nonetheless, the integration of multiple instrumental methods in field study designs could establish their diagnostic value as early markers in the preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease.

Keywords

Preventive Therapy Instrumental Method Parkinsonian Symptom Motor Performance Testing Complex Reaction Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Przuntek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologySt. Josef Hospital, University of BochumFederal Republic of Germany

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