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Pathogenesis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome virus infection and mode of horizontal transmission of hantavirus in bank voles

  • Irena N. Gavrilovskaya
  • Natalia S. Apekina
  • Alla D. Bernshtein
  • Varvara T. Demina
  • Natalia M. Okulova
  • Y. A. Myasnikov
  • M. P. Chumakov
Part of the Archives of Virology Supplementum book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 1)

Summary

Inapparent, persisting hantavirus infection was demonstrated in bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) after experimental infection with strain Kazan 6 C.g. isolated in the U.S.S.R. Virus, viral antigen, antibodies, and the capacity for horizontal transmission of infection were demonstrable throughout the period of observation (13 months), the highest titers being observed 10–20 days postinfection. Direct correlation was detected between the intensity of horizontal transmission and the level of humoral immunity. The progeny of infected females were shown to be passively immune for 30–45 days after birth and to be relatively resistant to infection with strain Kazan 6 C.g. during that period.

Keywords

Virus Antigen Bank Vole Horizontal Transmission Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome Infected Female 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irena N. Gavrilovskaya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Natalia S. Apekina
    • 1
  • Alla D. Bernshtein
    • 1
  • Varvara T. Demina
    • 1
  • Natalia M. Okulova
    • 1
  • Y. A. Myasnikov
    • 1
  • M. P. Chumakov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral EncephalitidesU.S.S.R. Academy of Medical SciencesMoscowUSSR
  2. 2.Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral EncephalitidesU.S.S.R. Academy of Medical SciencesMoscowUSSR

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