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Seroepidemiological survey for antibodies to arboviruses in Greece

  • A. Antoniadis
  • Stella Alexiou-Daniel
  • N. Malissiovas
  • J. Doutsos
  • Thalia Polyzoni
  • J. W. LeDue
  • C. J. Peters
  • G. Saviolakis
Part of the Archives of Virology Supplementum book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 1)

Summary

Plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) tests were used to detect human antibodies to certain viruses of the families Flaviviridae and Bunyaviridae. Blood samples for the serosurveys were mainly collected from healthy farmers, wood cutters and shepherds. By PRN test antibodies were found to West Nile, sandfly fever Naples, and sandfly fever Sicilian viruses with seropositives 1.2%, 16.7%, and 2.0%, respectively. Antibodies to Rift Valley fever virus were not detected. By IFA tests, antibodies to the phlebovirus Corfu, tick-borne encephalitis, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and Hantaan viruses were found with seropositives 4.0%, 1.7%, 1.0%, and 3.4%, respectively. Epidemiological data concerning the geographic and occupational distributions of the infected individuals are discussed.

Keywords

West Nile Virus Hemagglutination Inhibition Hemorrhagic Fever Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome Rift Valley Fever 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Antoniadis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stella Alexiou-Daniel
    • 1
  • N. Malissiovas
    • 1
  • J. Doutsos
    • 1
  • Thalia Polyzoni
    • 1
  • J. W. LeDue
    • 3
  • C. J. Peters
    • 3
  • G. Saviolakis
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Arbovirus National Reference Laboratory, School of MedicineAristotelian University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  2. 2.Arbovirus National Reference Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, School of MedicineAristotelian University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  3. 3.U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious DiseasesFrederickUSA

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