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Surveillance for arboviruses in the Soviet Union: relationships between ecologic zones and virus distribution

  • D. Lvov
  • A. Avershin
  • V. Andreev
  • Valeriya Aristova
  • A. Butenko
  • Olga Voltsit
  • Irina Galkina
  • V. Gromashevsky
  • G. Dmitriev
  • Y. Kondaurov
  • Nina Kondrashina
  • A. Kuznetsov
  • S. Lvov
  • Tatyana Morozova
  • Tatyana Skvortsova
  • Marina Shchipanova
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Virology Supplementum book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 1)

Summary

Results are presented of a systematic search in the territory of the U.S.S.R. for natural foci of arboviruses. We used ecological surveillance of territories through different landscape zones taking into account some climatic factors, determining the distribution of vectors and vertebrate hosts and the reproduction of different arboviruses therein. Surveillance was performed from latitude 72° to 40° North in arctic, subarctic, north taiga, south taiga, leaf-bearing forest, steppe and subtropical zones. Special attention was paid to the specific features of distribution of viruses of the California and Bunyamwera serogroups. For this purpose we collected specimens for virological and serological studies. Collections were made simultaneously in each of nine meridional sections of European and Asian U.S.S.R. covering about 7.5 million km2. We collected 1,256,000 mosquitoes, about 20,000 ticks, 3,500 vertebrates, more than 1,000 specimens from patients, and 20,000 serum specimens from asymptomatic humans and domestic animals. In this paper we discuss peculiarities of the distribution of arboviruses in different landscape climatic zones of northern Eurasia.

Keywords

West Nile Virus Middle Taiga Russian Plain Japanese Encephalitis Virus Landscape Zone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Filipova NA (1971) Species of group Ixodes persulcatus (Parasitiformes, Ixodidae). 6. Peculiarities of areas of I. pavlovsky Pomerantsev and I. persulcatus Schulze in connection with Paleogenesis. Parasitology 5: 305–391Google Scholar
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    Filipova NA (1973) Species of group Ixodes persulcatus (Parasitiformes, Ixodidae). 7. Paleogenesis of south branch of group Ixodes persulcatus (Porn.) and relationships with I. ricinus (L.). Parasitology 7: 3–13Google Scholar
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    Lvov DK (1987) Natural foci of arboviruses in the USSR. Soy Med Rev Virol 1: 153–196Google Scholar
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    Lvov DK, Klimenko SM, Gaidamovich SYa (1989) Arboviruses and arboviral infections. Meditsina, MoscowGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Lvov
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Avershin
    • 2
  • V. Andreev
    • 2
  • Valeriya Aristova
    • 2
  • A. Butenko
    • 2
  • Olga Voltsit
    • 2
  • Irina Galkina
    • 2
  • V. Gromashevsky
    • 2
  • G. Dmitriev
    • 2
  • Y. Kondaurov
    • 2
  • Nina Kondrashina
    • 2
  • A. Kuznetsov
    • 2
  • S. Lvov
    • 3
  • Tatyana Morozova
    • 2
  • Tatyana Skvortsova
    • 2
  • Marina Shchipanova
    • 2
  1. 1.D. I. Ivanovsky Institute of VirologyAcademy of Medical Sciences of the U.S.S.R.MoscowUSSR
  2. 2.D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology and MicrobiologyU.S.S.R. Academy of Medical SciencesMoscowUSSR
  3. 3.N.F. Gamaleya Institute of Epidemiology and MicrobiologyU.S.S.R. Academy of Medical SciencesMoscowUSSR

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