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Hyponatraemia and Volume Status in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

  • E. F. M. Wijdicks
  • M. Vermeulen
  • J. van Gijn
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 47)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate if and why patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and hyponatraemia have a poor outcome. Hyponatraemia is often explained by the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). In that case sustained secretion of antidiuretic hormone is maintained in the face of low osmolality and an expanded extracellular fluid volume, which in turn causes hyponatraemia and natriuresis (Lester and Nelson, 1981). Recently, however, it has been questioned whether inappropriate secretion of ADH really occurs after SAH, since decreased blood volumes have been demonstrated in patients with hyponatraemia, although they fulfilled the laboratory criteria for SIADH (Nelson et al. 1981). This doubt was corroborated by our retrospective review of a consecutive series of 134 patients with SAH.

Keywords

Antidiuretic Hormone Plasma Volume Intracranial Aneurysm Serum Sodium Level Inappropriate Secretion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. F. M. Wijdicks
    • 1
  • M. Vermeulen
    • 1
  • J. van Gijn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity Hospital UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

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