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Parkinson’s disease: development of dementia in aging

  • W. Danielczyk
  • P. Fischer
Part of the Key Topics in Brain Research book series (KEYTOPICS)

Summary

Mental changes in Parkinson’s disease have various etiologies which are separable on clinical and neuropsychological grounds. Dementia in Parkinson’s disease have been diagnosed much to frequently in the last two decades without using criteria for dementia as given in the DSM III. Reversible pharmacotoxic psychoses, depression, and isolated cognitive impairments may be misdiagnosed as dementia. At our department the mean death-age of 575 Parkinsonian patients has grown for about 12 years since 1950. Even very old patients with pure idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (proven at autopsy) were not found to be demented during life. But a high percentage of Parkinsonian patients were suffering from additional cerebrovascular or -degenerative disease during the final stages of their diseases.

Keywords

Locus Coeruleus Nucleus Basalis Parkinsonian Patient Geriatric Hospital Frontal Lobe Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Danielczyk
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Fischer
    • 3
  1. 1.Neurological DepartmentGeriatric Hospital LainzViennaAustria
  2. 2.Arbeitsgruppe Alzheimer-DemenzLudwig Boltzmann-Institut für AltersforschungAustria
  3. 3.Neurological InstituteUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria

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