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Fault Tolerant Systems

  • Peter Alan Lee
  • Thomas Anderson
Part of the Dependable Computing and Fault-Tolerant Systems book series (DEPENDABLECOMP, volume 3)

Abstract

In the chapters that follow, the measures and mechanisms which can be implemented to support the four constituent phases of fault tolerance are illustrated by practical examples taken, in the main, from fault tolerant systems that were actually constructed and put into operation. In order to set the scene for subsequent discussion of these examples, this chapter provides an overview of several systems from which the majority of examples have been taken.

Keywords

Processing Module Fault Tolerance Reliability Strategy Fault Tolerant System Program Store 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Alan Lee
    • 1
  • Thomas Anderson
    • 1
  1. 1.Computing LaboratoryUniversity of Newcastle upon TyneUK

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