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The patient with spinal infection

  • Gunnar B. J. Andersson
  • Thomas W. McNeill

Abstract

The key problem in spinal infection is the failure of the medical community to appreciate that these problems continue to exist and are actually relatively common and increasing in frequency. The increase in frequency is due to several factors: (1) Our elderly population is increasing, and even without concurrent illnesses this group has a less than normal competent immune system. (2) An increasing number of patients with immune deficiencies, either of the infectious acquired type or secondary to treatment of malignant or autoimmune disease. (3) Large migrations of populations from TB endemic regions.

Keywords

Spinal Tuberculosis Epidural Abscess Spinal Infection Vertebral Osteomyelitis Severe Back Pain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunnar B. J. Andersson
    • 1
  • Thomas W. McNeill
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryRush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical HospitalChicagoUSA

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