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Chronic s.c. Lisuride in Parkinson’s disease — motorperformance and avoidance of psychiatric side effects

  • S. Bittkau
  • H. Przuntek
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 27)

Summary

On-off fluctuations in longstanding Parkinson’s disease initially respond well to a combined drug regime of Levodopa with direct dopamine agonists and L-deprenyl. L-Dopa infusions are efficient, but not applicable for longer use. S. c.-Lisuride-infusions reduce markedly motor-response fluctuations, dystonias and hyperkinesias, but bear the risk of inducing confusion or even psychosis. In patients with coexisting response fluctuations and psychiatric disturbances a therapeutic approach is outlined to preserve still some favourable effects on motor performance avoiding severe psychosis. Side-effects and possible complications of that therapy are discussed as are some further indications for the clinical use of Lisuride in akinetic crisis, the neuroleptic malignant syndrome and in dyskinesias.

Keywords

Dopamine Agonist Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Psychiatric Disturbance Infusion Profile Response Fluctuation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Bittkau
    • 1
  • H. Przuntek
    • 2
  1. 1.Neurologische UniversitätsklinikWürzburgFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Neurologische UniversitätsklinikSt. Josef-HospitalBochumFederal Republic of Germany

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