Advertisement

Subcutaneous lisuride infusion in Parkinson’s disease: clinical results using different modes of administration

  • F. Stocchi
  • S. Ruggieri
  • A. Antonini
  • F. Baronti
  • G. Brughitta
  • P. Bellantuono
  • D. Bravi
  • A. Agnoli
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 27)

Summary

The continuous dopaminergic stimulation provided by infusion of dopamine agonist drugs, is a very effective strategy to control ON-OFF fluctuation in Parkinson’s disease. Lisuride is a potent dopamine agonist drug, very soluble in water and can be administred subcutaneously. Many authors have shown that the subcutaneous infusion of lisuride can control fluctuations when applied in combination with oral levodopa as a 24 hour continuous infusion regimen. In this study, lisuride was given without any other antiparkinsonian medicament and using a 12 hour infusion regimen wherever possible. 13 fluctuating Parkinsonian patients were studied. 6 out of these 13 were satisfactorly treated with lisuride alone and the remaining 7 with a combination of Lisuride + oral levodopa. Only in 3 out of 13 patients the 24 hour infusion regimen was required.

Keywords

Infusion Regimen Psychiatric Side Effect Dopa Decarboxylase Inhibitor Continuous Dopaminergic Stimulation Continuous Infusion Regimen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bittkau S, Przuntek H (1986) Lisuride infusion pump for Parkinson’s disease. Lancet 2: 349Google Scholar
  2. Critchley P, Perez FG, Quinn N, Coleman R, Parkes D, Marsden CD (1986) Psychosis and the lisuride pump. Lancet 2: 349PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Marion MH, Stocchi F, Quinn NP, Jenner P, Marsden CD (1986) Repeated levodopa infusions in fluctuating Parkinson’s disease: clinical and pharmacokinetic data. Clin Neuropharmacol 9: 165–181PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Nutt JG, Woodward WR, Hammerstad JP, Carter JH, Anderson JL (1984) The on-off phenomenon in Parkinson’s disease: relation to levodopa absorption and transport. N Engl J Med 23: 483–488CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Obeso JA, Luquin MR, Martinez-Lage JM (1983) Lisuride infusion for Parkinson’s disease. Ann Neurol 14: 134–139CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Obeso JA, Luquin MR, Martinez-Lage JM (1986) Lisuride infusion pump: a device for the treatment of motor fluctuations in Parkinson’s disease. Lancet 1: 467–470PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Quinn N, Marion MH, Stocchi F, Jenner P, Marsden CD (1986) Intravenous dopamine agonist studies in Parkinson’s disease. In: Fahn S, Marsden CD, Jenner P, Teychenne P (eds) Recent developments in Parkinson’s disease. Raven Press, New York, pp 247–253Google Scholar
  8. Ruggieri S, Stocchi F, Agnoli A (1986) Lisuride infusion pump for Parkinson’s disease. Lancet 2: 348–349CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Shoulson I, Glaubiger GA, Chase TN (1975) On-off response: clinical and biochemical correlations during oral and intravenous levodopa administration in parkinsonian patients. Neurology 25: 1144–1148PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Stocchi F, Ruggieri S, Brughitta G, Agnoli A (1986) Problems in daily performances in Parkinson’s disease: the continuous dopaminergic stimulation. J Neural Transm [Suppl] 22: 223–229Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Stocchi
    • 1
  • S. Ruggieri
    • 1
  • A. Antonini
    • 1
  • F. Baronti
    • 1
  • G. Brughitta
    • 1
  • P. Bellantuono
    • 1
  • D. Bravi
    • 1
  • A. Agnoli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Rome “La Sapienza”RomeItaly

Personalised recommendations