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Subcutaneous administration of lisuride in the treatment of complex motor fluctuations in Parkinson’s disease

  • J. A. Obeso
  • M. R. Luquin
  • J. Vaamonde
  • J. M. Martînez Lage
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 27)

Summary

28 patients with Parkinson’s disease showing complex “on-off” fluctuations in response to chronic levodopa plus dopa decarboxylase inhibitor (po) were treated with subcutaneous lisuride using a portable infusion pump. All patients improved initially during the first weeks of treatment. Four patients abandoned the trial within the first few weeks as a consequence of psychiatric complications (2 cases), inability to understand how to use the pump (one case) and subcutaneous nodule formation plus psychological rejections to wearing a pump (one case). All other 24 patients were treated for a minimum periods of 3 months (mean 9.6 months, maximum 24 months). The average daily dose of lisuride was 2.80mg. The levodopa dose was reduced by 37%, but total withdrawal was not possible in any patient. Among the 18 patients who continued treatment at present, about 50% are independent and capable of undertaking most daily life activities. Psychiatric side-effects were present in 9 patients leading to permanent withdrawal in five.

Subcutaneous lisuride infusions added to oral levodopa are clearly effective in patients with severe motor fluctuations. Careful selection of suitable patients and close monitoring is mandatory in order to obtain the best therapeutic results while reducing the risk of psychiatric adverse effects.

Keywords

Motor Fluctuation Levodopa Dose Psychiatric Complication Daily Levodopa Dopa Decarboxylase Inhibitor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Obeso
    • 1
  • M. R. Luquin
    • 1
  • J. Vaamonde
    • 1
  • J. M. Martînez Lage
    • 1
  1. 1.Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Clínica Universitaria, Medical SchoolUniversity of NavarraPamplonaSpain

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