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Perspectives in MAO: past, present, and future

A review
  • T. P. Singer
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 23)

Abstract

A plethora of international symposia have been devoted to monoamine oxidases in the past 15 years, including Cagliari, Sardinia (1971); CIBA Symposium, London (1975); Midland, Michigan (1979); Budapest (1979); Göteborg (1980); Airlie House, Virginia (1981); Hakone, Japan (1981); Mannheim, Germany (1982), and Paris (1983), and the First Workshop on MAO in Cambridge, England (1984). One might, in fact, wonder if progress in this field has been sufficiently rapid to justify the choice of MAO as the subject of these frequent tribal rituals. Probably not. Perhaps the reason lies elsewhere. Few topics in the bio-medical sciences interlink the interests of as varied a group of investigators in different disciplines as does MAO. One might add that even fewer problems require as much interdisciplinary effort for progress as does MAO, as has been dramatically illustrated in recent work on the experimental Parkinsonism induced by MPTP.

Keywords

Monoamine Oxidase Amine Oxidase Kinetic Isotope Effect Beef Liver Subunit Molecular Weight 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. P. Singer
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Molecular Biology DivisionVeterans Administration Medical CenterSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biochemistry and BiophysicsUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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