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Photoradiation Therapy with Hematoporphyrin Derivative in the Management of Brain Tumors

  • Robert E. WharenJr.
  • Robert E. Anderson
  • Edward R. LawsJr.

Abstract

Hematoporphyrin is a naturally occurring compound similar to the heme of hemoglobin without the iron ligand (Fig. 1). Since the observation by Lipson44–46 in 1960 that a derivative of hematoporphyrin (HpD) had superior tumor localizing characteristics when compared to hematoporphyrin, all subsequent clinical studies have used HpD.

Keywords

High Power Density Malignant Brain Tumor Violet Light Photodynamic Effect Hematoporphyrin Derivative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. WharenJr.
    • 1
  • Robert E. Anderson
    • 1
  • Edward R. LawsJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo ClinicMayo Medical SchoolRochesterUSA

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