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Abstract

Ginseng, the famous plant drug, has been used as an expensive traditional medicine in oriental countries for more than 5000 years. The source plant of this drug is Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer (Araliaceae), a herb with fleshy roots which grows wild in cool and shady forests extending from Korea and North Eastern China to Far Eastern Siberia. Because the wild plant is relatively rare, it has been cultivated in Korea, China and Japan. After four or six years, the carrot-like roots of P. ginseng are steamed and dried to prepare “Red Ginseng”, while the peeled roots dried without steaming are designated as “White Ginseng”. In our chemical studies of this plant, White Ginseng was used unless otherwise stated. Dried lateral roots and roots dried without peeling are also used for the preparation of Ginseng prescription. Two closely related plants, American Ginseng (P. quinquefolium L., produced in the U.S.A. and Canada) and Sanchi-Ginseng (=Tienchi, roots of P. notoginseng (Burk.) F. H. Chen, cultivated in Yunnan, China) are also used for similar medicinal purposes.

Keywords

Panax Ginseng American Ginseng Ginseng Root Ginseng Extract Ginseng Saponin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Tanaka
    • 1
  • R. Kasai
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Pharmaceutical SciencesHiroshima University School of MedicineKasumi, HiroshimaJapan

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