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Abstract

This review is mainly concerned with the structures, sources and biological properties of those natural products containing the 1,2-diphenyl-propane ring system (see Chart 1, and compare with the isomeric 1,3-diphenylpropane skeleton common to flavonoid compounds), and which collectively are known as isoflavonoids. Also briefly considered, however, are the glucosidic deoxybenzoin derivative, onospin (630), as well as several 2-arylbenzofurans (Table 2, Section R) of leguminous origin which lack a carbon atom corresponding to that marked (Chart 1) with an asterisk (*). These latter compounds and onospin are included because whilst they cannot be regarded as isoflavonoids, it is by no means uncommon to find that in the family Leguminosae they co-occur with (and in certain instances may originate from) isoflavonoids having similar aromatic substitution.

Keywords

Root Bark Cicer Arietinum Trifolium Pratense Isoflavone Glycoside Dalbergia Sissoo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Ingham
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of ReadingReadingUK

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