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Classical Scattering Theory

  • W. Thirring
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Physica Austriaca book series (FEWBODY, volume 23/1981)

Abstract

It was first recognized by Hunziker [1] that the notions of scattering theory play an important role in classical mechanics. It turned out [2] that it leads to non-trivial information for the global properties of the solutions of the classical trajectories. For instance it shows that in the three body problem there are large regions in phase space with 2n — 1 = 17 constants of motion and all trajectories in this region are homotopic to straight lines. Furthermore Wigner’s [3] time delay has a simple geometrical meaning [4] for the trajectories. For instance it shows that in the three body problem there are large regions in phase space with 2n − 1 = 17 constants of motion and all trajectories in this region are homotopic to straight lines.

Keywords

Phase Space Free Motion Canonical Transformation Canonical Coordinate System Negative Time Delay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Thirring
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Theoretische PhysikUniversität WienAustria

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