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Clinical Guide to Classification of Dysphasic Syndromes

  • Martin L. Albert
  • Harold Goodglass
  • Nancy A. Helm
  • Alan B. Rubens
  • Michael P. Alexander
Part of the Disorders of Human Communication book series (DISORDERS, volume 2)

Abstract

The preceding short examination for dysphasia can be used to provide a rough clinical guide to Classification of dysphasic syndromes. Formal language evaluation should be carried out to refine the initial impression. We emphasize that many patients with dysphasia do not have signs which can be easily or neatly categorized, regardless of the technical skill or years of experience of the examiner; in such cases a thoughtful description of the Observation is more helpful than an attempt to force the clinical findings to conform to a pre-conceived category.

Keywords

Technical Skill Formal Language Spontaneous Speech Mixed Variety Initial Impression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin L. Albert
    • 1
    • 2
  • Harold Goodglass
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Nancy A. Helm
    • 3
    • 5
  • Alan B. Rubens
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Michael P. Alexander
    • 3
    • 9
  1. 1.Aphasia Research CenterBoston University Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Neurology SectionBoston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA
  3. 3.Boston University Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  4. 4.Psychology ResearchBoston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA
  5. 5.Neurology ServiceBoston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA
  6. 6.University of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  7. 7.Neurobehavior UnitHennepin County Medical CenterMinneapolisUSA
  8. 8.Hennepin County Medical CenterMinneapolisUSA
  9. 9.Neurobehavior UnitBoston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA

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