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What Approaches to Dysphasia Rehabilitation Are Felt to Be Most Effective?

  • Martin L. Albert
  • Harold Goodglass
  • Nancy A. Helm
  • Alan B. Rubens
  • Michael P. Alexander
Part of the Disorders of Human Communication book series (DISORDERS, volume 2)

Abstract

Speech pathologists are called upon to rehabilitate adults with disorders which ränge from global dysphasia with severe impairment in all language modalities, to anomic dysphasia with impairment only in substantive word finding. There is little reason to expect that disorders which vary widely in nature should or can be treated in a similar manner. There are, of course, some general principles which can be applied to any rehabilitative process and dysphasia is no exception. Such clinicians as Backus (1937) and Schuell, Jenkins and Jiméniz-Pabón (1964) provide us with general principles of treatment, and these principles are no less appropriate today than when they were written. Few of us would dispute, for example, that speech processes operate with greater facility when the individual experiences a reasonable degree of social adequacy (Backus, 1937), or that the clinician should elicit and not force the response (Schuell, Jenkins and Jiménez-Pabón, 1964). But while such principles may guide us in the treatment process, we must have a specific method in mind when sitting across from the patient.

Keywords

Sentence Type Global Patient Auditory Comprehension Popular Song Syntactical Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin L. Albert
    • 1
    • 2
  • Harold Goodglass
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Nancy A. Helm
    • 3
    • 5
  • Alan B. Rubens
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Michael P. Alexander
    • 3
    • 9
  1. 1.Aphasia Research CenterBoston University Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Neurology SectionBoston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA
  3. 3.Boston University Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  4. 4.Psychology ResearchBoston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA
  5. 5.Neurology ServiceBoston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA
  6. 6.University of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  7. 7.Neurobehavior UnitHennepin County Medical CenterMinneapolisUSA
  8. 8.Hennepin County Medical CenterMinneapolisUSA
  9. 9.Neurobehavior UnitBoston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA

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