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Scale Formation in Flagellates

  • D. K. Romanovicz
Part of the Cell Biology Monographs book series (CELLBIOL, volume 8)

Abstract

In the context of a cell wall, the term scale is used to describe a discrete, morphologically distinct wall subunit synthesized within the cell. Following exocytosis, the scales become arranged on the surface of the cell in one or more layers forming a cell wall. This simple functional definition belies the great diversity of scale morphology and composition. Scales ränge from 30 nm (Manton and Ettl 1965) to 14 nm (Manton et al. 1976 a) in diameter, some bearing spines up to 75 µm in length (Moestrup 1974 a, Manton 1978 a). In some species, the scales are constructed of organic micro– fibrils (Brown et al. 1970), and may bear crystals of calcium carbonate (Manton and Leedale 1969). In others, the scales are composed of silica and may be three-dimensional, reticulate structures (Pennick and Clarke 1972) or flat plates with perforations (Harris and Bradley 1958). Still other species produce membranous scales with no discernible substructure (Belcher and Swale 1967, Darley et al. 1973). Despite this diversity in morphology and composition, for most organisms in which scale biosynthesis has been investigated, the scales have been shown to arise within the cisternae of the Golgi apparatus (Moestrup 1974 a, Olive 1975).

Keywords

Golgi Apparatus Scale Formation Golgi Cisterna Scale Morphology Body Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. K. Romanovicz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyWest Georgia CollegeCarrolltonUSA

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