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Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors as Anti-Depressant Drugs and as Adjunct to L-Dopa Therapy of Parkinson’s Disease

  • M. B. H. Youdim
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 16)

Abstract

Monoamine oxidase inhibitors have been used in Psychiatric disorders for many years. However, due to the toxic side effects of the drugs they are often replaced by the tri- and tetracyclic antidepressants.

Selective monoamine oxidase inhibitors like deprenyl, however, have been tried with success as adjuvant therapy in Parkinson’s disease and depression because of their ability to inhibit dopamine oxidation. Perhaps their greatest advantage is their lack of pressor response.

Keywords

Mental Disease Monoamine Oxidase Depressive Illness Hypertensive Crisis Tetracyclic Antidepressant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. B. H. Youdim
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Technion—Israel Institute of Technology Department of PharmacologyFaculty of MedicineHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacology, Technion—Israel Institute of TechnologyFaculty of MedicineHaifaIsrael

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