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Insect Pheromones: A Critical Review of Recent Advances in Their Chemistry, Biology, and Application

  • J. M. Brand
  • J. Chr. Young
  • R. M. Silverstein
Part of the Fortschritte der Chemie organischer Naturstoffe / Progress in the Chemistry of Organic Natural Products book series (FORTCHEMIE (closed), volume 37)

Abstract

The chemical basis of insect behavior is firmly established and forms an integral part of regulatory biology. The many and varied studies on this topic constitute part of an overall attempt to understand behavior at the molecular level. A better understanding of this subject will only come about by interdisciplinary collaboration between chemists and biologists.

Keywords

Bark Beetle Gypsy Moth Aggregation Pheromone Alarm Pheromone Boll Weevil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Brand
    • 1
  • J. Chr. Young
    • 2
  • R. M. Silverstein
    • 3
  1. 1.Iowa CityUSA
  2. 2.OttawaCanada
  3. 3.SyracuseUSA

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