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Molecular Biology of Adenoviruses

  • L. Philipson
  • U. Pettersson
  • U. Lindberg
Part of the Virology Monographs / Die Virusforschung in Einzeldarstellungen book series (VIROLOGY, volume 14)

Abstract

In his biography “Arrow in the Blue” the author Arthur Koestler suggests ironically that the fate of an individual may be predicted by examining the content of the newspapers at birth. Adenoviruses were discovered in 1953 (Rowe et al., 1953; Hilleman and Werner, 1954). At this time the Salk poliomyelitis vaccine was developed (Salk et al., 1954) and in the same year the discovery of the double helical structure of DNA (Watson and Crick, 1953) and the plaque assay for one animal virus (Dulbecco and Vogt, 1953) was announced. Thus, this new group of viruses was born with great hopes for progress in molecular biology and for the control of animal virus infections. In the short interval between 1953 and 1956 the adenoviruses were discovered, methods for laboratory diagnosis and serotyping were established, the epidemiology was clarified and a highly effective vaccine was developed and approved (for a review see Hilleman, 1966). Succeeding years showed, however, that the vaccines were contaminated with the oncogenic SV40 virus and that the adenoviruses themselves were tumorigenic.

Keywords

Adenovirus Infection Adenovirus Type Human Adenovirus Adenovirus Serotypes Empty Capsid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Philipson
    • 1
  • U. Pettersson
    • 1
  • U. Lindberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, The Wallenberg LaboratoryUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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