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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to stimulate curiosity, not to satisfy it. The physiological and biochemical problems that confront the plant pathologist are legion. An improved understanding of the physiological processes involved in plant pathology inevitably leads to improvement in our ability to control plant diseases, which in the U. S. A. alone take a toll of some 3 billion dollars worth of crops annually.

Keywords

Tomato Plant Gibberellic Acid Fusarium Wilt Crown Gall Fusaric Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag in Vienna 1959

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. E. Dimond
    • 1
  1. 1.New HavenUSA

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