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Efficient Management of K-Level Transitive Closure

  • Keh-Chang Guh
  • Pintsang Chang
Conference paper

Abstract

A k-level transitive closure of a directed graph is all pairs of vertices (x, y) such that there exists at least a path from x to y of length d, d≤k. Multiple edges between a pair of vertices are allowed in a graph. This paper presents a data structure to store materialized k-level transitive closure such that retrievals and updates of a k-level transitive closure with path information being kept may be performed efficiently.

Keywords

Directed Path Query Processing Transitive Closure Multiple Edge Data Engineer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keh-Chang Guh
    • 1
  • Pintsang Chang
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer ScienceUniversity of Wisconsin — MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.COVIA PartnershipRosemontUSA

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