Advertisement

Machine Accessible Communications for the Office Environment

  • Sashidhar P. Reddi

Abstract

A significant number of communications within an organization are routine but essential for conducting business. We propose a means by which such routine activities may be transferred to an intelligent communications system. This paper presents a rich and theoretically founded language, that provides the user with great expressibility in stating his message, and the design of a system to support the language. The precise structure and definition of the language makes the content of the messages accessible to processing by computers and facilitates inferencing. We have also included an overview of a language-based system’s implementation and functionality for the domain of office communications.

Keywords

Order Logic Propositional Attitude Electronic Mail Message Type Semantic Rule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Austin, John L., How to Do Things with Words, Oxford at the Clarendon Press, Oxford, England, 1962.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Bach, Kent and Robert M. Harnish, Linguistic Communication and Speech Acts, The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1979.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Chang, S. K. and L. Leung, “A Knowledge-Based Message Management System,” ACM Transactions on Office Information Systems, 5, no. 3, (1987), 213–236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Corner, D. E. and L. L. Peterson, “Conversations—An Alternative to Memos and Conferences,” Byte, 10, no. 13, (1985), 263–272.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Corner, D. E. and L. L. Peterson, “Conversation Based Mail,” ACM Transactions on Computer Systems,4, no. 4, (1986), 299–319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    Edwards, Daniel W., “Electronic Data Interchange: A Senior Management Overview,” International Center for Information Technologies, 2000 M Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036, 202–659–1314, 1987.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Frost and Sullivan, Inc., The Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Market in the U.S., Frost and Sullivan, Inc., 106 Fulton Street, New York, NY 10038, 212–233–1080, April 1988.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Hiltz, S.R., K. Johnson, and M. Turoff, “Experiments in Group Decision Making—Communication Process and Outcome in Face-to-Face Versus Computerized Conferences,” Human Communication Research, 13, no. 2, (1986), 225–252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    Hiltz, S.R. and M. Turoff, “Structuring Computer-Mediated Communications Systems to Avoid Information Overload,” Communications of the ACM, 28, no. 7, (1985), 680–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. [10]
    Kimbrough, Steven O., “On Representation Schemes for Electronic Promising,” forthcoming in Decision Support Systems, (1989).Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    Kimbrough, Steven O., Sashidhar P. Reddi and Michael Thornburg, “On Messaging with Semantic Access in an Office Environment,” University of Pennsylvania, Department of Decision Sciences, working paper, 1989. (forthcoming, Journal of Management Information Systems)Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Kimbrough, Steven O. and Ronald M. Lee, “On Illocutionary Logic as a Telecommunications Language,” Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Information Systems, Leslie Maggi et al., eds., San Diego, CA, (December 15–7, 1986 ), 15–26.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    Lee, Ronald M. “CANDID – A Logical Calculus for Describing Financial Contracts, ” Ph.D thesis, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Decision Sciences, working paper 80–06–2, 1980.Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    Lee, Ronald M. and Ranjit Bose, “Deontic Reasoning in Bureaucratic Systems,” Proceedings of the 21st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, (January 1988).Google Scholar
  15. [15]
    Levinson, Stephen C., Pragmatics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1983.Google Scholar
  16. [16]
    Malone, Thomas W., Kenneth R. Grant, Franklyn A. Turbak, Stephen A. Brobst, and Michael D. Cohen, “Intelligent Information-Sharing Systems,” Communications of the ACM, 30, no. 5, (1987), 390–402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. [17]
    Malone, Thomas W., Kenneth R. Grant, Kum-Yew Lai, Ra-mana Rao, and David Rosenblitt, Kum-Yew Lai, Ra-mana Rao, and David Rosenblitt, “Semistructured Messages Are Surprisingly Useful for Computer-Supported Coordination,” ACM Transactions on Office Information Systems, 5, no. 2, (1987).Google Scholar
  18. [18]
    Malone, T. W., J. Yates, and R. I. Benjamin, “Electronic Markets and Electronic Hierarchies,” Communications of the ACM, 30, no. 6, (1987), 484–497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. [19]
    Searle, John R. and Daniel Vanderveken, Foundations of Illocutionary Logic, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1985.MATHGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sashidhar P. Reddi
    • 1
  1. 1.The Wharton School of the University of PennsylvaniaUSA

Personalised recommendations