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Data-Intensive Applications in Open Networks: Extending the Modelling, Programming and Communication Support

  • Winfried Lamersdorf

Abstract

New requirements for extended computer support arise from various areas of advanced data-intensive applications. For example, the increased integration of data and knowledge initiated a number of database system extensions. Other requirements of new data-intensive applications lead to extended support for complex data objects. Similarly, an increasing number of data-intensive applications today is based on distributed application scenarios with locally distributed cooperation. Such applications require extended communication facilities in ‘Open Systems’ computer networking environments. In all cases, services of advanced data management functions should be offered to programmers via appropriate high-level programming language interfaces. Consequently, integrated systems realizing computer support for advanced data intensive applications include the following DBMS extensions: support for data and knowledge modelling, communication facilities for accessing remote system components in distributed systems, programming language interfaces, etc..

This paper concentrates on concepts and implementation proposals for extending data-intensive applications into a distributed open network environment. After a brief classification of database management systems generalizations into distributed environments, the paper focuses in detail on three areas of supporting advanced data-intensive applications: the presented data modelling extensions introduce complex data objects into a distributed database environment following an object-oriented approach; at the programming language interface it is demonstrated how an appropriate database and programming language can be used to specify distributed applications; and, finally, the addressed communication facilities show how access to remote databases in a heterogeneous environment can be realized based on dedicated open systems communication protocols.

Keywords

Complex Object Database Management System Database Application Transaction Management Language Interface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Winfried Lamersdorf
    • 1
  1. 1.IBM European Networking CenterHeidelbergWest-Germany

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