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Locating Pressure Control Elements for Leakage Minimisation in Water Supply Networks by Genetic Algorithms

  • K. S. Hindi
  • Y. M. Hamam

Abstract

The complex problem of choosing the types of pressure-control elements, locating them and determining their settings in order to minimise leakage in water supply networks is addressed. The difficulty stems from the discrete nature of the choice/location variables, as well as from the fact that the problem is invariably large-scale, due to the size of the networks involved, in addition to being nonlinear and non-convex due to the nature of the head-flow relationships. The paper describes the design of a genetic algorithm to solve the problem and compares the results obtained with those obtained by a mixedinteger programming model developed earlier by the authors.

Keywords

Genetic Algorithm Control Element Normalise Fitness String Length Gate Valve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. S. Hindi
    • 1
  • Y. M. Hamam
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ComputationUniversity of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (U-MIST)ManchesterBritain
  2. 2.Ecole Superieure d’Ingenieurs en Electrotechnique et ElectroniqueNoisy-Le-GrandFrance

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