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The Genie Project — A Genetic Algorithm Application to a Sequencing Problem in the Biological Domain.

  • J. D. Walker
  • P. E. File
  • C. J. Miller
  • W. B. Samson
Conference paper

Abstract

This paper describes the current development and implementation of a form of genetic algorithm (GA) suitable for tackling a complex sequencing problem in the biological domain — the building of restriction “maps” from the results of partial digest experiments. Building restriction maps is a time-consuming and lengthy activity which relies on human judgement of inexact data.

The paper is organised into the following sections. The procedure for building restriction enzyme maps is described in section 2. There are several aspects of map assembly which make it a relevant problem to study from a GA point of view and these are outlined in section 3. The GENIE project is an ongoing project and the way in which the problem is being tackled by developing a GA and the implementation issues are discussed in section 4. Preliminary results are shown in section 5, the paper is summarised in section 6 and section 7 highlights future developments.

Keywords

Genetic Algorithm Travelling Salesman Problem Hybrid Genetic Algorithm Sequencing Problem Biological Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. Walker
    • 1
  • P. E. File
    • 1
  • C. J. Miller
    • 1
  • W. B. Samson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mathematical and Computer SciencesDundee Institute of TechnologyDundeeUK

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