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Genetic Algorithms versus Tabu Search for Instruction Scheduling

  • Steven J. Beaty

Abstract

Most scheduling problems require either exponential time or space to generate an optimal answer [7]. Instruction scheduling is an instance of a general scheduling problem and Dewitt [8] uses this fact to show instruction scheduling is a NP-complete problem. This paper applies Genetic Algorithms, Tabu Search, and list scheduling to the instruction scheduling problem and compares the results obtained by each.

Keywords

Genetic Algorithm Schedule Problem Tabu Search Flow Shop Tabu List 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven J. Beaty
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.NCR MicroelectronicsFort CollinsUSA
  2. 2.Colorado State UniversityUSA

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