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Increase of optical illusion in demented patients

  • B. Weber
  • L. Frölich
  • N. Helbing
  • D. Simminger
  • J. Fritze
  • K. Maurer
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission. Supplementa book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 54)

Summary

Assuming a particular psychological function of optical gestalt perception, its impairment would lead to a decreasing extent of gestalt related optical illusion. An increase of optical illusion would be expected in the case of a loss of adaptability and cognitive compensation, usually revising the phenomenon of optical illusion. 16 demented out-patients were compared to 16 hospitalized schizophrenics by a ‘Computerized Assessment of Change in Optical Illusion’ (CACOI), measuring the extent of optical illusion by patient’s assessment of 12 variations of the figure of Mueller-Lyer, differing in baseline length. The results showed a significant increase of optical illusion in demented patients compared to the schizophrenic controls (p = 0.019). Taking into account that the extent of optical illusion by the figure of Mueller-Lyer usually is decreasing with age and was found to be increased in schizophrenics, our results support the hypothesis of an early loss of adaptability and cognitive compensation in dementia.

Keywords

Schizophrenic Patient Visual Illusion Demented Patient Baseline Length Spearman Rank Order Correlation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Weber
    • 1
  • L. Frölich
    • 1
  • N. Helbing
    • 1
  • D. Simminger
    • 1
  • J. Fritze
    • 1
  • K. Maurer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy IJ. W. Goethe University FrankfurtFrankfurt / MainFederal Republic of Germany

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