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What are the relations between Lewy body disease and AD?

  • I. G. McKeith
  • P. Ince
  • E. B. Jaros
  • A. Fairbairn
  • C. Ballard
  • J. Grace
  • C. M. Morris
  • R. H. Perry
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission. Supplementa book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 54)

Summary

Several hospital based autopsy series indicate dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) to be the second most common pathological subtype of degenerative dementia in elderly subjects. The majority of DLB cases have high densities of β amyloid senile plaques, whereas neocortical neurofibrillary tangle density is only slightly increased above age-matched normal control values and over tenfold lower than the average in Alzheimer’s disease. The interpretation of this Alzheimer type pathology is problematic, reflecting in part changing views about the neuropathological diagnosis of AD itself. AD is characterised by hyperphosphorylation of the microtubular associated protein tau, and DLB by neurofilament abnormalities including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, proteolysis, and cross-linking of constituent proteins. The two diseases appear therefore to be distinct at an ultrastructural and molecular level, a conclusion which is consistent with the fact that the clinical syndromes associated with DLB and AD are sufficiently differentiated to allow for accurate antemortem diagnosis.

Keywords

Lewy Body Dementia With Lewy Body Alzheimer Pathology Lewy Body Disease Paired Helical Filament 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. G. McKeith
    • 1
    • 4
  • P. Ince
    • 2
  • E. B. Jaros
    • 3
  • A. Fairbairn
    • 1
  • C. Ballard
    • 2
  • J. Grace
    • 1
  • C. M. Morris
    • 2
  • R. H. Perry
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Old Age Psychiatry, Institute for the Health of the ElderlyNewcastle General HospitalNewcastle upon TyneUK
  2. 2.MRC Neurochemical Pathology Unit, Institute for the Health of the Elderly, Newcastle General HospitalUniversity of Newcastle upon TyneNewcastle upon TyneUK
  3. 3.Department of Neuropathology, Institute for the Health of the ElderlyNewcastle General HospitalNewcastle upon TyneUK
  4. 4.Department of Old Age Psychiatry, Institute for the Health of the ElderlyNewcastle General HospitalNewcastle upon TyneUK

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