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More Lessons on Business Process Re-engineering from the Tourism and Hospitality Industries: the case of ALPHA Flight Services

  • Michael Baker
  • Gerry Sweeney

Abstract

Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) is, or claims to be, a relatively recent phenomenon, with Michael Hammer’s (1990) Harvard Business Review article being widely credited as seminal, and others quickly following, claiming that by identifying and streamlining key business processes, “top-down” reorganisation and innovative use of IT, business performance could be radically improved. Hammer and Champy (1993) describe it as “the fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical, contemporary measures of performance, such as cost, quality, service and speed.”

Keywords

Business Process Manage Business Process Industrial Engineering Hospitality Industry Staff Morale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Baker
    • 1
  • Gerry Sweeney
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Management Studies for the Service SectorUniversity of SurreyUK
  2. 2.General Manager — Quality AssuranceALPHA Flight ServicesUK

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