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Importance-driven Stochastic Ray Radiosity

  • Attila Neumann
  • László Neumann
  • Philippe Bekaert
  • Yves D. Willems
  • Werner Purgathofer
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

The stochastic ray radiosity method [10] is a radiosity method in which no form-factors are computed explicitly. Because of this, the method is very well-suited to compute the radiance distribution in very complex diffuse environments. In this paper we present an extension of this method which will provide a significant reduction of computational cost in cases where accurate knowledge of the illumination is needed in only a small part of the scene. This is accomplished by computing a second quantity, called importance, during the radiance computation. Importance is then used to modulate the patch sampling probabilities in order to obtain lower variance in relevant regions of the scene.

Keywords

Computer Graphic Total Importance Radiance Computation Virtual Screen Observer Position 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien1996 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Attila Neumann
    • 1
  • László Neumann
    • 1
  • Philippe Bekaert
    • 2
  • Yves D. Willems
    • 2
  • Werner Purgathofer
    • 3
  1. 1.BudapestHungary
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceKatholieke Universiteit LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  3. 3.Institute of Computer GraphicsTechnical University of ViennaWienAustria

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