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The Light Volume: an aid to rendering complex environments

  • Ken Chiu
  • Kurt Zimmerman
  • Peter Shirley
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

The appearance of an object depends on both its shape and how it interacts with light. Alter either of these and its appearance will change. Neglect either of these and realism will be compromised. Computer graphics has generated images ranging from nightmarish worlds of plastic, steel, and glass to gently-lit, perfect interiors that have obviously never been inhabited. The reassuring realism lacking in these extremes requires the simulation of both complex geometry and complex light transport.

Keywords

Light Volume Computer Graphic Conference Proceeding Particle Trace Global Illumination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien1996 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ken Chiu
    • 1
  • Kurt Zimmerman
    • 1
  • Peter Shirley
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Indiana UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Cornell UniversityUSA

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