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Arboviruses as imported disease agents: the need for increased awareness

  • D. J. Gubler
Part of the Archives of Virology Supplement II book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 11)

Summary

The arboviruses are an important group of etiologic agents that are transported between geographic regions in infected animals and humans. This group of viruses is briefly reviewed as agents of imported disease and dengue viruses are discussed as an example to illustrate the trend of increasing incidence of imported arboviral diseases.

Keywords

Dengue Virus Dengue Fever Vertebrate Host Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Japanese Encephalitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Gubler
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Vector-Borne Infectious DiseasesNational Center for Infectious DiseasesFort CollinsUSA
  2. 2.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health ServiceU.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesFort CollinsUSA

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