Advertisement

Abstract

The last report on lignin in these “Fortschritte” is that of Freuden-Berg (102). Since then a considerable amount of work on lignin has been carried out, especially by Erdtman, Freudenberg, Hibbert, and Wacek, and their co-workers. Some progress in fundamental knowledge has been made, although the final solution of the problem of the lignin structure is still to be found. Brief reviews of special phases of lignin chemistry, particularly on the structure, were published recently by Baroni (27), Brauns (56), Erdtman (85), Freudenberg (103, 104), Hibbert (152), Krüger (193), Lange (208), McCarthy (226), Percival (254), Phillips (256), Wacek (308), and Yorston (332).

Keywords

Methoxyl Group Building Stone Copper Chromite Raney Nickel Coniferyl Alcohol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Adams, G. A. and G. A. Ledingham: Biological Decomposition of Chemical Lignin. I. Sulfite waste liquor. Canad. J. Res., Sect. C 20, 1 (1942).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Adams, G. A. and G. A. Ledingham: Biological Decomposition of Chemical Lignin. III. Application of a new Ultraviolet Spectrographic Method to the Estimation of Sodium Ligno-sulfonate in Culture Media. Canad. J. Res., Sect. C 20, 101 (1942).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Adkins, H., R. L. Frank and E. S. Bloom: The Products of the Hydrogenation of Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 549 (1941).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ahlm, C. E.: An Investigation of Spruce Thiolignin. Paper Trade J. 113, no. 13, 115 (1941).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Allen, C. F. H. and J. R. Byers: A Synthesis of Coniferyl alcohol. Science [New York] 107, 269 (1948).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Aries, R. S.: Plastics from Lignin. Chem. Industries 56, 226 and 416 (1945).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Aries, R. S.: Research on Lignin as a Soil Builder. Northeast. Wood Util. Council, Bull. no. 7, 56 (1945).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Aries, R. S.: Lignin as a Fertilizer Material. Paper Trade J. 123, no. 21, 47 (1946).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Astbury, W. T. and D. M. Wrinch: Intermolecular Folding of Proteins by Keto-enol Interchange. Nature [London] 139, 798 (1937).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Aulin-Erdtman, G.: Die Struktur des Dehydrodi-isoeugenols. Svensk kem. Tidskr. 54, 168 (1942).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Aulin-Erdtman, G.: Einige Modellversuche zur Chemie des Lignins. Svensk kem. Tidskr. 55, 116 (1943).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Aulin-Erdtman, G.: Spektrographische Beiträge zur Ligninchemie. Svensk Papperstidn. 47, 91 (1944).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Aulin-Erdtman, G., A. Björkman, H. Erdtman U. S. E. Hägglund: Einige Überlegungen und Modellversuche zur Sulfitierung des Lignins. Svensk Papperstidn. 50, no. 11 B, 81 (1947).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Bailey, A. J.: The Chemistry of Lignin. I. The Existence of a Chemical Bond between Lignin and Cellulose. Paper Trade J. 110, no. 1, 29 (1940).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Bailey, A. J.: The Chemistry of Lignin. II. The Butanolysis of Wood. Paper Trade J. 110, no. 2, 29 (1940).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Bailey, A. J.: The Heterogeneity of Lignin. Paper Trade J. 111, no. 7, 27 (1940).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Bailey, A. J.: Preparation and Properties of Butanol Lignin. Paper Trade J. 111, no. 6, 27 (1940).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Bailey, A. J.: The Chemistry of Butanol Lignin. Paper Trade J. 111, no. 9, 86 (1940).Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Bailey, A. J.: Hydrolytic Derivatives of Lignin Volatile Compounds. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 64, 22 (1942).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Aulin-Erdtman, G.: Volatile Hydrogenation Derivatives of Lignin. J. Amer, chem. Soc. 65, 1165 (1943).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Aulin-Erdtman, G.: High-boiling Hydrolytic Derivatives of Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 69, 575 (1947).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Aulin-Erdtman, G.: The Lignin-alcohol Condensation. The Reaction of Lignin with Amino-and Nitro-butanol. Paper Ind. Paper Wld. 29, 1606 (1948).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Bailey, A. J. and H. M. Brooks: Electrolytic Oxidation of Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 68, 445 (1946).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Bailey, A. J. and O. W. Ward: Synthetic Lignin Resin and Plastic. Ind. Engng. Chem. 37, 1199 (1945).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Baker, S. B., T. H. Evans and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXXV. Synthesis and Properties of Dimers Related to Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 70, 60 (1948).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Baker, S. B. and H. Hibbert. Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXXVI. Hydrogenation of Dimers Related to Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 70, 63 (1948).Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Baroni, E.: Struktur des Lignins. I. Neuere Ergebnisse. Papier, Pappe, Zellulose, Holzstoff 58, 1 (1940).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Bartlett, J. B.: The Effect of Decomposition of the Lignin of Plant Materials. Iowa State Coll. J. Sci. 14, 11 (1939).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Bennett, E.: Are Pectic Substances Precursors to Lignin? Science [New York] 91, 95 (1940).Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Bobrov, P. A. and L. I. Kolotova: Hydrogenation of Waste Sulfite Liquors. C. R. [Doklady] Acad. Sci. URSS 24, 46 (1939).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Bond, W. J., I. G. Goddard and G. F. Wright: The Isolation of Sassafras Lignin. Canad. J. Res., Sect. B 25, 535 (1947).Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Bower, J. R., Jr., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXIII. Hydrogenation of Wood (part 2). J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3066 (1941).Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Bower, J. R., Jr., L. M. Cooke, and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXX. Hydrogenolysis and Hydrogenation of Maple Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1192 (1943).Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Bower, J. R., Jr., L. M. Cooke, and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXI. The Course of Formation of Native Lignin in Spruce Buds. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1195 (1943).Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Brauns, F. E.: Native Lignin. I. The Isolation and Methylation. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 2120 (1939).Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Brauns, F. E.: Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Lignin. Paper Trade J. 111, no. 14, 33 (1940).Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Brauns, F. E.: The Nature of Lignin from Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). J. org. Chemistry 10, 211 (1945).Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Brauns, F. E.: The Occurrence of Conidendrin in Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). J. org. Chemistry 10, 216 (1945).Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Brauns, F. E.: The Utilization of Lignin. T. A. P. P. I. Bull. no. 84, 3 pp. (1946).Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Brauns, F. E.: The Stability of the Methoxyl Groups in Methylated Hydrochloric Acid Spruce Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 68, 1721 (1946).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Brauns, F. E.: (unpublished).Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Brauns, F. E. and M. A. Buchanan: Acetic Acid Spruce Lignin and Acetic Acid Willstätter Spruce Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 67, 645 (1945).Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Brauns, F. E. and M. A. Buchanan: The Reaction between Thio Compounds and Lignin. Paper Trade J. 122, no. 21, 49 (1946).Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Brauns, F. E. and H. Hibbert: Methanol Lignin. Canad. J. Res., Sect. B 13, 28 (1935).Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Brauns, F. E. and W. H. Lane: Thiophenol Spruce Lignin. Paper Trade J. 122, no. 8, 38 (1946).Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Brauns, F. E. and H. F. Lewis: The Nature of the Lignin in Redwood Bark. Paper Trade J. 119, no. 22, 34 (1944)Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Brauns, F. E., H. F. Lewis and E. B. Brookbank: Lignin Ethers and Esters; Preparation from Lead and other Metallic Derivatives of Lignin. Ind. Engng. Chem. 37, 70 (1945).Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    Brauns, F. E. and J. J. Yirak: The Decomposition of Methylated Spruce Wood. Paper Trade J. 125, no. 12, 55 (1947).Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    Brawn, J. S., R. D. Heddle and J. A. F. Gardner: The Ethanolysis of Western Red Cedar, Douglas Fir and Western Hemlock. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 62, 3251 (1940).Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    Brewer, C. P., L. M. Cooke and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXXIV. The High Pressure Hydrogenation of Maple Wood: Hydrol Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 70, 57 (1948).Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    Brickman, L., J. J. Pyle and H. Hibbert: The Aldehydic Constituents from the Ethanolysis of Spruce and Maple Woods. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 523 (1939).Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    Brickman, L., J. J. Pyle, W. L. Hawkins and H. Hibbert: Structure of the Ethanolysis Products from Spruce and Maple Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 62, 986 (1940).Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    Brookbank, E. B.: Recovery and Uses of Byproduct Soda Lignin. Chemurgic Digest 2, 97 (1943).Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    Brookbank, E. B.: Industrial Uses of Alkali Lignin. Paper Trade J. 122, no. 13, 44 (1946).Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    Brookbank, E. B. and F. E. Brauns: The Chemical Nature of Douglas Fir Lignin. Paper Trade J. 110, no. 5, 33 (1940).Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    Brookbank, E. B., F. E. Brauns, H. F. Lewis and M. A. Buchanan: New Derivatives of Lignin. Paper Trade J. 116, no. 13, 27 (1943).Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Buchanan, M. A.: (unpublished).Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    Calhoun, J.M., F. H. Yorston and O. Maass: A Study of the Mechanism and Kinetics of the Sulfite Process. Canad. J. Res., Sect. B 17, 121 (1939).Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Campbell, W. G. and J. C. McGowan: Color Reactions of Lignin and Tannins. Nature [London] 143, 1022 (1939).Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    Carpenter, J. S. and H. K. Benson: Chemical Derivatives of Lignin: Nitro-lignin. Pacific Pulp Paper Ind. 14, no. 12, 17 (1940).Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    Charbonnier, H.Y.: Lignins Isolated in the Presence of Butanol. Paper Trade J. 114, no. 11, 31 (1942).Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    Clark, J. C. and F. E. Brauns: Esters of Certain Lignin Derivatives. Paper Trade J. 119, no. 6 33 (1944).Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    Conner, W. P.: High Frequency Energy Losses in Solutions Containing Macromolecules. J. chem. Physics 9, 591 (1941).Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    Cooke, L. M., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LX. Hydrogenation Studies on Maple Ethanolysis Products. I. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3052 (1941).Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    Cooke, L. M., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXI. Hydrogenation of Ethanolysis Fractions from Maple Wood. II. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3056 (1941).Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    Coppick, S. and W. F. Fowler, Jr.: The Location of Potential Reducing Substances in Woody Tissues. Paper Trade J. 109, no. 11, 81 (1939).Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    Cramer, A. B. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XLV. Synthesis and Properties of α-Hydroxypropiovanillone. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 2204 (1939).Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    Cfamer, A. B., J. M. Hunter and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XXXV. The Ethanolysis of Spruce Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 509 (1939).Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    Creighton, R. H. J., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LIX. Aromatic Aldehydes from Plant Materials. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3049 (1941).Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    Creighton, R. H. J., R. D. Gibbs and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXV. Alkaline Nitrobenzene Oxidation of Plant Materials and Application to Taxonomic Classification. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 32 (1944).Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    Creighton, R. H. J. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXVI. Alkaline Nitrobenzene Oxidation of Corn Stalks. Isolation of p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 37 (1944).Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    Cundy, P. F.: A Comparison of Ancient and Modern Sequoia Wood. Madrono 7, 145 (1946).Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    Dadswell, H. E. and D. J. Ellis: Study of the Cell Wall. I. Methods of Demonstrating Lignin Distribution in Wood. J. Council sci. ind. Res. 13, 44 (1940).Google Scholar
  74. 74.
    Dorland, R. M. and H. Hibbert: Formic Acid as a Solvent for Ozonization Investigations. Canad. J. Res.,. Sect. B 18, 30 (1940).Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    Dorland, R. M., W. L. Hawkins and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XLVI. The Action of Ozone on Isolated Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 2689 (1939).Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    Dryden, E. C., J. D. Reid and S. I. Aronovsky: A Note on the Effect of Repeated Treatment of Corncob Lignin by the 72% Sulfuric Acid Method. Paper Trade J. 119, no. 11, 119 (1944).Google Scholar
  77. 77.
    Dunn, S. and J. Seiberlich: Uses of Lignin in Agriculture. Mechan. Engng. 69, 197 and 212 (1947).Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    Dunn, S., J. Seiberlich and D. S. Eppelsheimer: The Use of Lignin in Potato Feltilizer. Northeast. Wood Util. Council, Bull. 7, 21 (1945).Google Scholar
  79. 79.
    Eastham, A. M., H. E. Fisher, M. Kulka and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXIV. Relation of Wood Ethanolysis Products to the Hibbert Series of Plant Respiratory Catalysts. Allylic and Dismutation Rearrangements of 3-Chloro-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl).2-propanone and 1-Bromo-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl).2-propanone. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 26 (1944).Google Scholar
  80. 80.
    Enders, C.: Wie entsteht der Humus in der Natur? Die Chemie 56, 281 (1943).Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    Erbring, H. and H. Peter: Zur Kenntnis des Lignins. Kolloid-Z. 96, 47 (1941).Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    Erdtman, H.: Dehydrierungen in der Coniferylreihe. II. Dehydrodi-isoeugenol. Liebigs Ann. Chem. 503, 283 (1933).Google Scholar
  83. 83.
    Erdtman, H.: Über die Wirkung von Phenolen beim Sulfitkochprozeß. Svensk Papperstidn. 43, 255 (1940).Google Scholar
  84. Erdtman, H.: Cellulosechemie 18, 83 (1940).Google Scholar
  85. 84.
    Erdtman, H.: Untersuchungen über Sulfitablaugen. I. Die Fällbarkei.t der Ligninsulfon-säuren durch organische Basen. Svensk kern. Tidskr. 53, 201 (1941).Google Scholar
  86. 85.
    Erdtman, H.: Developments in Lignin Chemistry in Recent Years. Svensk Papperstidn. 44, 243 (1941).Google Scholar
  87. 86.
    Erdtman, H.: Investigations of Sulfite Waste Liquor. IL The Methodical Separation of the Constituents of Sulfonic Acids from Sulfite Waste Liquor with Organic Bases. Svensk Papperstidn. 45, 315 (1942).Google Scholar
  88. 87.
    Erdtman, H.: Untersuchungen über Sulfitablaugen. III. Zusammensetzung und Eigenschaften verschiedener Ligninsulfonsäurefraktionen aus technischen Sulfitablaugen. Svensk Papperstidn. 45, 374 (1942).Google Scholar
  89. 88.
    Erdtman, H.: Untersuchungen über Sulfitablaugen. IV. Methylierte Ligninsulfonsäuren aus bei der Herstellung von Kunstseidenzellstoff und von starkem Zellstoff anfallenden Ablaugen. Svensk Papperstidn. 45, 392 (1942).Google Scholar
  90. 89.
    Erdtman, H.: Untersuchungen über schwefelarme Ligninsulfonsäuren. Svensk Papperstidn. 48, 75 (1945).Google Scholar
  91. 90.
    Erdtman, H., G. Aulin-Erdtman and B. Lindgren: The Sulfonation of Spruce Lignin. Svensk Papperstidn. 49, 199 (1946).Google Scholar
  92. 91.
    Ernsberger, F. M. and W. G. France: Some Physical and Chemical Pioperties of Weight-fractionated Lignosulfonic Acids, Including the Dissociation of Lignosulfonates. J. Phys. Colloid Chem. 52, 267 (1948).Google Scholar
  93. 92.
    Fernández, O. and B. Regueiro: Enzymatic Degradation of Lignin. Farm. nueva 11, 57, 111, 169 and 223 (1946).Google Scholar
  94. Fernández, O. and B. Regueiro: Revista de la real Academia de Ciencias 39, 331 (1945).Google Scholar
  95. 93.
    Fisher, E.: The Action of Organic Acids on Corn Stalk Lignin. Iowa State Coll. J. Sci. 17, 241 (1943).Google Scholar
  96. 94.
    Fisher, E. and R. S. Bower: The Action of Organic Nitrogen Bases on Corn Stalk Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 1881 (1941).Google Scholar
  97. 95.
    Fisher, H. E. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXXIII. Synthesis of 3-Hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl).2-propanone. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 69, 1208 (1947).Google Scholar
  98. 96.
    Fisher, H. E., M. Kulka and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXIX. Synthesis and Properties of 3-Hydroxy-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl).2-propanone. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 598 (1944).Google Scholar
  99. 97.
    Fisher, J. H., W. L. Hawkins and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XLVTI. The Synthesis of Xylosides Related to Lignin Plant Constituents. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 62, 1412 (1940).Google Scholar
  100. 98.
    Fisher, J. H., W. L. Hawkins and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LIV. Synthesis and Properties of Glycosides Related to Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3031 (1941).Google Scholar
  101. 99.
    Forman, L. V.: Action of Ultraviolet Light on Lignin. Paper Trade J. 111, no. 21, 34 (1940).Google Scholar
  102. 100.
    Fredenhagen, K. u. J. Cadenbach: Der Abbau der Zellulose durch Fluorwasserstoff und ein neues Verfahren der Holzverzuckerung durch hochkonzentrierten Fluorwasserstoff. Angew. Chem. 46, 113 (1933).Google Scholar
  103. 101.
    Freudenberg, K.: Tannin, Cellulose, Tannin. Berlin: J. Springer. 1933.Google Scholar
  104. 102.
    Freudenberg, K.: Lignin. Fortschr. Chem. organ. Naturstoffe 2, 1 (1939).Google Scholar
  105. 103.
    Freudenberg, K.: Polysaccharides and Lignin. Ann. Rev. Biochem. 8, 81 (1939).Google Scholar
  106. 104.
    Freudenberg, K.: Die Grundzüge der Ligninchemie. Chemiker-Ztg. 68, 39 (1944).Google Scholar
  107. 105.
    Freudenberg, K.: Die aromatische Natur des Lignins im Holze. Cellulosechemie 22, 117 (1944).Google Scholar
  108. 106.
    Freudenberg, K. u. L. Acker: Über die Einwirkung von Glykolchlorhydrin auf Fichtenlignin. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 74, 1400 (1941).Google Scholar
  109. 107.
    Freudenberg, K. u. K. Adam: Die Verschwelung des Lignins im Wasserstoffstrom. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 74, 387 (1941).Google Scholar
  110. 108.
    Freudenberg, K., W. Lautsch u. K. Engler: Die Bildung von Vanillin aus Fichtenholz. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 73, 167 (1940).Google Scholar
  111. 109.
    Freudenberg, K., W. Lautsch u. G. Piazolo: Die Einwirkung von Kalium in Ammoniak auf das Lignin und Holz der Fichte und Buche. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 74, 1879 (1941).Google Scholar
  112. 110.
    Freudenberg K., W. Lautsch u. G. Piazolo: Die Einwirkung von Sulfit auf Fichtenholz bei 70°. Cellulosechemie 22, 97 (1944).Google Scholar
  113. 111.
    Freudenberg K., W. Lautsch u. G. Piazolo: Die Nitrierung des Fichtenlignins. Die aromatische Natur des Lignins im Holze. Cellulosechemie 21, 95 (1943).Google Scholar
  114. 112.
    Freudenberg, K., W. Lautsch, G. Piazolo u. A. Scheffer: Die Druckhydrierung des Lignins und der ligninhaltigen Ablaugen der Fichte. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 74, 171 (1941).Google Scholar
  115. 113.
    Freudenberg, K. u. K. Plankenhorn: Die Herkunft des Formaldehyds aus dem Lignin. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 80, 149 (1947).Google Scholar
  116. 114.
    Freudenberg K., W. Lautsch u. G. Piazolo: Über Essigsäure-Lignin. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 75, 857 (1942).Google Scholar
  117. 115.
    Freudenberg, K. u. TH. Plötz: Über enzymatische Abbauversuche an Holz. Holz als Roh-u. Werkstoff 3, 105 (1940).Google Scholar
  118. 116.
    Freudenberg, K. u. TH. Plötz: Die quantitative Bestimmung des Lignins. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 73, 754 (1940).Google Scholar
  119. 117.
    Freudenberg, K. u. H. Richtzenhain: Enzymatische Versuche zur Entstehung des Lignins. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 79, 997 (1943).Google Scholar
  120. 118.
    Freudenberg, K. u. H. Richtzenhain: Die Konstitution des Dehydro-di-isoeugenols und seine Bedeutung für die Chemie des Lignins. Liebigs Ann. Chem. 522, 126 (1942).Google Scholar
  121. 119.
    Freudenberg, K., H. Richtzenhain, E. Flickinger u. K. Engler: Modellversuche zur Ligninfrage. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 72, 1805 (1939).Google Scholar
  122. 120.
    Freudenberg, K. u. F. Sohns: Zur Kenntnis des Lignins. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 66, 262 (1933).Google Scholar
  123. 121.
    Freudenberg, K. u. H. Walsch: Die Phenolgruppen im Lignin. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 76, 305 (1943).Google Scholar
  124. 122.
    Friese, H. u. W. Lüdecke: Lignin. XIII. Über eine Spaltung des Holzes mittels Nitrierung. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 74, 308 (1941).Google Scholar
  125. 123.
    Fuller, J. E.: Influence of Purified Lignin on Nitrification in Soil. Science [New York] 104, 313 (1946).Google Scholar
  126. 124.
    Gardner, J. A. F. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXXII. Synthesis and Properties of 1,3-Diacetoxy-1-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxy-phenyl).2-propanone and 1-Acetoxy-3-chloro-1-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl). 2-propanone and their Relation to Lignin Structure. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 607 (1944).Google Scholar
  127. 125.
    Glading, R. E.: The Ultraviolet Absorption Spectra of Lignin and Related Compounds. Paper Trade J. 111, no. 23, 32 (1940).Google Scholar
  128. 126.
    Godard, H. P., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Hydrogenation of Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 62, 988 (1940).Google Scholar
  129. 127.
    Godard, H. P., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXII. High Pressure Hydrogenation of Wood Using Copper Chromite Catalyst. I. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3061 (1941).Google Scholar
  130. 128.
    Gralén, N.: The Molecular Weight of Lignin. J. Colloid Sci. 1, 453 (1946).Google Scholar
  131. 129.
    Griffioen, K.: Presence of Combined Lignins in Plant Material. Chem. Weekbl. 36, 81 (1939).Google Scholar
  132. 130.
    Hachihama, Y., S. Zyodai and M. Umezu: Lignin and Related Compounds. I. Hydrogenation of Softwood Lignin. J. Soc. chem. Ind. Japan, suppl. Bind. 43, 127 (1940).Google Scholar
  133. 131.
    Hägglund, E.: Holzchemie. Leipzig: Akad. Verlagsges. 1939.Google Scholar
  134. 132.
    Hägglund, E.: Über Schwefellignin und seine Bedeutung bei dem Sulfatkochprozeß. Holz als Roh-u. Werkstoff 4, 236 (1941).Google Scholar
  135. 133.
    Hägglund, E.: Thio (sulfide) Lignin and its Role in the Sulfate Process. Svensk Papper-stidn. 44, 183 (1941).Google Scholar
  136. 134.
    Harlow, W. M.: Contribution to the Chemistry of the Plant Cell Wall. IX. Further Studies on the Location of Lignin, Cellulose and other Components in Woody Cell Walls. Paper Trade J. 109, no. 18, 38 (1939).Google Scholar
  137. 135.
    Harris, E. E.: Utilization of Waste Lignin; Current Chemical Research. Ind. Engng. Chem. 32, 1049 (1940).Google Scholar
  138. 136.
    Harris, E. E.: Hydrogenation of Lignin. Paper Trade J. 111, no. 24, 27 (1940).Google Scholar
  139. 137.
    Harris, E. E., J. D’Ianni and H. Adkins: Reaction of Hardwood Lignin with Hydrogen. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 60, 1467 (1938).Google Scholar
  140. 138.
    Harris, E. E. and L. J. Lofdahl: The Reaction of Methyl Hypochlorite with Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 112 (1941).Google Scholar
  141. 139.
    Harris, E. E., J. Saeman and E. C. Sherrard: Hydrogenation of Lignin in Aqueous Solutions. Ind. Engng. Chem. 32, 440 (1940).Google Scholar
  142. 140.
    Haworth, R. D.: Constitution of Natural Phenolic Resins. Nature [London] 147, 255 (1941).Google Scholar
  143. 141.
    Haworth, R. D. and D. Woodcock: The Constituents of Natural Phenolic Resins. XV. The Stereochemical Relationship of Lariciresinol and Pinoresinol. J. chem. Soc. [London] 1939, 1054.Google Scholar
  144. 142.
    Hechtman, J. F.: The Behavior of Some Lignin Preparations in the Molecular Still. Paper Trade J. 114, no. 22, 45 (1942).Google Scholar
  145. 143.
    Hedlund, I.: Über die Ligninkondensation beim Sulfitkochprozeß. Svensk Papperstidn. 50, no. 11 B, 109 (1947).Google Scholar
  146. 144.
    Hess, K. U. K. E. Heumann: Über Feinstvermahlung verholzter Zellwände und die Reaktionsfähigkeit des Lignins mit Hydrazin. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 75, 1802 (1942).Google Scholar
  147. 145.
    Hewson, W. B. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXV. Re-ethanolysis of Isolated Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1173 (1943).Google Scholar
  148. 146.
    Hewson, W. B., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LVII. Mechanism of the Ethanolysis Reaction. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3041 (1941).Google Scholar
  149. 147.
    Hewson, W. B., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LVIII. The Mechanism of the Ethanolysis of Maple Wood at High Temperatures. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3045 (1941).Google Scholar
  150. 148.
    Hibbert, H.: The Structure of Lignin. Canad. J. Res., Sect. B 16, 69 (1938).Google Scholar
  151. 149.
    Hibbert, H.: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XXXVII. The Structure of Lignin and the Nature of Plant Synthesis. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 725 (1939).Google Scholar
  152. 150.
    Hibbert, H.: The Mechanism of Plant Respiration. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 62, 984 (1940).Google Scholar
  153. 151.
    Hibbert, H.: Status of the Lignin Problem. Paper Trade J. 113, no. 4, 35 (1941).Google Scholar
  154. 152.
    Hibbert, H.: Lignin. Ann. Rev. Biochem. 11, 183 (1942).Google Scholar
  155. 153.
    Hill, A. C.: Recent Advances in the Utilization of Lignin in Waste Sulfite Liquor. Pulp Paper. Mag. Canada 41, 148 (1940).Google Scholar
  156. 154.
    Hilpert, S. R. u. H. Hellwage: Buchenholz-Lignin, ein Reaktionsprodukt der Kohlehydrate bei der Ligninbestimmung. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 68, 380 (1935).Google Scholar
  157. 155.
    Hilpert, S. R. u. H. Meybier: Zusammenhänge zwischen den Bestimmungen der Pentosane und des Lignins. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 71, 1962 (1938).Google Scholar
  158. 156.
    Hilpert, S. R. u. J. Pfützenreuter: Die Charakterisierung der pflanzlichen Zellwand durch Behandeln mit Kupferoxyd-Ammoniak-Lösung. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 71, 2220 (1938).Google Scholar
  159. 157.
    Hilpert, S. R. u. J. Pfützenreuter: Die Einwirkung von Äthylendiaminkupferoxyd-Lösung auf Holz und Stroh. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 72, 607 (1939).Google Scholar
  160. 158.
    Hilpert, S. R., W. Krüger u. G. Hechler: Die Einwirkung von Salpetersäure auf Hölzer. Ein Beitrag zur Chemie des Lignins. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 72, 1075 (1939).Google Scholar
  161. 159.
    Holmberg, B.: Ligninuntersuchungen. I. Über das Sulfitlaugenlacton. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 54, 2389 (1921).Google Scholar
  162. 160.
    Holmberg, B.: Ligninuntersuchungen. XVI. Fichtenholz und Thiohydracrylsäure. Ark. Kemi, Mineral. Geol. 21 (1945).Google Scholar
  163. 161.
    Holmberg, B.: Ligninuntersuchungen. XVII. Espenhölzer und Mercaptosäuren. Ark. Kemi, Mineral. Geol. 24 (1947).Google Scholar
  164. 162.
    Holmberg, B.: Lignin und Thioglykolsäure. Österr. Chemiker-Ztg. 43, 152 (1940).Google Scholar
  165. 163.
    Holmberg, B.: Lignin. XV. Über Bromlaugenlignine. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 75, 1760 (1942).Google Scholar
  166. 164.
    Holmberg, B.: Lignin. XVIII. Die Alkoholyseprodukte des Fichtenholzes. Svensk Papperstidn. 50, no. 11 B, 111 (1947).Google Scholar
  167. 165.
    Holmberg, G. u. N. Gralén: Die Stöchiometrie des Fichtenlignins. Ing. Vetensk. Akad., Handl. 162, 29 pp. (1942).Google Scholar
  168. 166.
    Hunter, M. J., A. B. Cramer and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XXXVI. Ethanolysis of Maple Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 516 (1939).Google Scholar
  169. 167.
    Hunter, M. J. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XLI. The Detection, Isolation and Estimation of the Syringyl Radical in Plant Products. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 2190 (1939).Google Scholar
  170. 168.
    Hunter, M. J. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XLIII. The Absence of the Piperonyl Group in the Lignin Structure. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 2196 (1939).Google Scholar
  171. 169.
    Iwadare, K.: Lignin. IV. Oxidation with Nitrobenzene. J. chem. Soc. Japan 62, 1095 (1941).Google Scholar
  172. 170.
    Jahn, E. C.: General Utilization of Lignin and Wood Wastes. Paper Mill Wood Pulp News 63, no. 23, 18 (1940).Google Scholar
  173. 171.
    Jahn, E. C.: Utilization of Lignin. News Edit. (Amer. chem. Soc.) 18, 993 (1940).Google Scholar
  174. 172.
    Jahn, E. C. and W. M. Harlow: Chemistry of Ancient Beech Stakes from the Fishweir. The Boylston Street Fishweir: Papers of the Report of the Robert S. Peabody Foundation for Archaeology 2, 90 (1942).Google Scholar
  175. 173.
    Jayme, G., L. Eser u. G. Hanke: Über die Entstehung von „Überschuß-substanz“ beim Chloritaufschluß von Hölzern und ihre Bedeutung für die Chemie des Holzes und des „Lignins“. Naturwiss. 31, 274 (1943).Google Scholar
  176. 174.
    Jayme, G. u. G. Hanke: Über die Natriumchlorit-Oxydationsprodukte und die Konstitution des nativen Fichtenholzlignins. Cellulosechemie 21, 127 (1943).Google Scholar
  177. 175.
    Jayme, G. u. M. Härders-Steinhäuser: Über eine Methode zum mikroskopischen Nachweis des Protolignins in pflanzlichen Zellwänden und ihre Anwendung auf Buchenholz. Holzforsch. 1, 33 (1947).Google Scholar
  178. 176.
    Jodl, R.: Feinstrukturuntersuchungen über Lignine. Brennstoff-Chem. 23, 163 (1942).Google Scholar
  179. 177.
    Jones, G. M. and F. E. Brauns: Ethers of Certain Lignin Derivatives. Paper Trade J. 119, no. 11, 108 (1944).Google Scholar
  180. 178.
    Junker, E.: Kolloidchemische Eigenschaften des Humus. Zur Dispersionschemie des Lignins. Kolloid-Z. 95, 213 (1941).Google Scholar
  181. 179.
    Kawai, S. u. N. Sugiyama: Untersuchungen über Egonol. VII. Synthese der beiden Egonol-Abbauprodukte Dihydro-coniferylalkohol und Styraxinol-aldehyde. Zum Reaktionsmechanismus der Flavyliumsalz-Synthese. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 72, 369 (1939).Google Scholar
  182. 180.
    Kawamura, J.: A new Constituent of Tsuga Resin. Bull. Imp. Forestry Exp. Stat. Tokyo 31, 73 (1932).Google Scholar
  183. 181.
    Keilen, J. J.: Lignin as Detergent Ingredient. Soap Sanit. Chemicals 21, 40, 146 (1945).Google Scholar
  184. 182.
    Keilen, J. J. and A. Pollak: Lignin for Reinforcing Rubber. Ind. Engng. Chem. 39, 480 (1947).Google Scholar
  185. 183.
    Keimatsu, S., T. Ishiguro and G. Yamamoto: The Constituents of Resins. V. The Constitution of Tsuga Lacton (Tsuga resinols). J. pharmac. Soc. Japan 55, 226 (1935).Google Scholar
  186. 184.
    Kleinert, TH.: Über die Aufnahme von Phenol durch die Holzsubstanz und ihre Hauptbestandteile. Cellulosechemie 18., 115 (1940).Google Scholar
  187. 185.
    Kratzl, K.: Über die Synthese von Modellsubstanzen für Ligninsulfosäuren. II. Über einige in der Seitenkette substituierte Propiophenonderivate. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 76, 895 (1943).Google Scholar
  188. 186.
    Kratzl, K.: Zur Biogenese des Lignins. Über das Lignin etiolierter Kartoffelkeimlinge. Experientia 4, 110 (1948).Google Scholar
  189. 187.
    Kratzl, K.: Über die Konstitution der Ligninsulfosäure. Mh. Chem. 78, 173 (1948).Google Scholar
  190. 188.
    Kratzl, K.: Die Ligninsulfosäure und ihre technische Verwertung. Experientia 2, 469 (1946).Google Scholar
  191. 189.
    Kratzl, K. u. CH. Bleckmann: Über die Bromierung von Ligninsulfosäure und deren Modellsubstanzen. Experientia 2, 24 (1946).Google Scholar
  192. 190.
    Kratzl, K. u. CH. Bleckmann: Über die Bromierung der Ligninsulfosäure und deren Modellsubstanzen. Mh. Chem. 76, 185 (1947).Google Scholar
  193. 191.
    Kratzl, K. u. H. Däubner: Über die Sulfitkochung von Phenylpropanderivaten und Chalkonen. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 77, 519 (1944).Google Scholar
  194. 192.
    Kratzl, K., H. Däubner u. U. Siegens: Über die Sulfitkochung von Phenyl-propanderivaten. II. Mh. Chem. 77, 146 (1947).Google Scholar
  195. 193.
    Krüger, D.: Die Gewinnung von Lignin und Ligninderivaten bei verschiedenen Verfahren des Holzaufschlusses. Zellstoff u. Papier 21, 299 (1941).Google Scholar
  196. Krüger, D.: Holz als Roh-u. Werkstoff 5, 36 (1942).Google Scholar
  197. 194.
    Krüger, W.: Die Einwirkung von Salpetersäure auf pflanzliche Samenschalen. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 73, 493 (1940).Google Scholar
  198. 195.
    Kürschner, K.: Azokohlenwasserstoffe aus Nitroligninen (Nitrohumussäuren) und aromatischen Aminen. Cellulosechemie 18, 70 (1940).Google Scholar
  199. 196.
    Kürschner, K.: Über Kohlehydratverunreinigungen in isolierten Ligninen und Roh-cellulosen aus Holz. Cellulosechemie 18, 64 (1940).Google Scholar
  200. 197.
    Kürschner, K.: Schwankende Grundlagen der Ligninchemie? Cellulosechemie 21, 141 (1943).Google Scholar
  201. 198.
    Kürschner, K. u. F. Schindler: Lignin und Huminsubstanzen. Papierfabrikant 38, 254 (1940).Google Scholar
  202. 199.
    Kürschner, K. u. F. Schindler: Bemerkungen über die Trennung von Lignin und Humusstoffen. Papierfabrikant 38, 34 (1940).Google Scholar
  203. 200.
    Kürschner, K. u. F. Schindler: Neue Bemerkungen über Nitrolignine. Cellulosechemie 18, 12 (1940).Google Scholar
  204. 201.
    Kürschner, K. u. K. Wittenberger: Nitrolignine verschiedener Holzarten bei der Halogenaufnahme in Vakuum. Cellulosechemie 18, 21 (1940).Google Scholar
  205. 202.
    Kulka, M., H. E. Fisher, S. B. Baker and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXVII. Re-investigation of the Ethanolysis Products of Maple Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 39 (1944).Google Scholar
  206. 203.
    Kulka, M., W. L. Hawkins and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LIII. Isolation of Vanilloyl and Syringoyl Methyl Ketones from Ethanolysis Products of Maple Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 2371 (1941).Google Scholar
  207. 204.
    Kulka, M. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXVII. Isolation and Identification of 1-(4-Hydioxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl). 2-propanone and 1-(4-Hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl).2-propanone from Maple Wood Ethanolysis Products. Metabolic Changes in Lower and Higher Plants. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1180 (1943).Google Scholar
  208. 205.
    Kulka, M. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXVIII. Synthesis and Properties of 1-Ethoxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-propanone, 3-Ethoxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl).2-propanone, and their Methyl Ethers. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1185 (1943).Google Scholar
  209. 206.
    Lange, P. W.: The Nature and Distribution of Lignin in Spruce Wood. Svensk Papperstidn. 47, 262 (1944).Google Scholar
  210. 207.
    Lange, P. W.: The Ultraviolet Absorption of Solid Lignin. Svensk Papperstidn. 48, 241 (1945).Google Scholar
  211. 208.
    Lange, P. W.: Some Views on the Lignin in the Woody Fiber during the Sulfite Cook. Svensk Papperstidn. 50, no. 11 B, 130 (1947).Google Scholar
  212. 209.
    Larson, L. L.: Nature of Lignin Residues in Unbleached and Partially Bleached Sulfite Pulp. Paper Trade J. 113, no. 21, 25 (1941).Google Scholar
  213. 210.
    Larsson, A.: Ligninsulfonsäuren aus Ablaugen von Untersuchungen über Sulfitablaugen. V. Espenholz-Sulfit-Kochungen. Svensk Papperstidn. 46, 93 (1943).Google Scholar
  214. 211.
    Larsson, A.: Neuere Ergebnisse der Ligninforschung. Brennstoff-Chem. 22, 265 (1941).Google Scholar
  215. 212.
    Larsson, A.: Über die oxydative und hydrierende Destruktion des Holzes, des Lignins und der schwefelhaltigen Ablaugen der Fichte. Cellulosechemie 19, 69 (1941).Google Scholar
  216. 213.
    Larsson, A.: Über Ionenaustauscher auf Lignin-Basis. Die Chemie 57, 149 (1944).Google Scholar
  217. 214.
    Lautsch, W. u. G. Piazolo: Über den oxydativen Abbau halogensubstituierter Fichtenlignine. Ber. dtsch chem Ges. 73, 317 (1940).Google Scholar
  218. 215.
    Lautsch, W. u. G. Piazolo: Über die Hydrierung von Lignin und ligninhaltigen Stoffen mit wasserstoffabgebenden Mitteln, insbesondere Alkoholen. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 76, 486 (1943).Google Scholar
  219. 216.
    Ledingham, G. A. and G. A. Adams: Biological Decomposition of Chemical Lignin. II. Studies on the Decomposition of Calcium Lignosulfonate by Wood Destroying and Soil Fungi. Canad. J. Res., Sect. C 20, 13 (1942).Google Scholar
  220. 217.
    Lewis, H. F., F. E. Brauns, M. A. Buchanan and E. B. Brookbank: Lignin Esters of Mono-and Di-basic Aliphatic Acids. Ind. Engng. Chem. 35, 1113 (1943).Google Scholar
  221. 218.
    Lieff, M., F. G. Wright and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XXXVIII. The Effect of Solvents in the Grignard Analysis for Active Hydrogen and Carbonyl. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 865 (1939).Google Scholar
  222. 219.
    Lieff, M., F. G. Wright and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XL. The Extraction of Birch Lignin with Formic Acid. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 1477 (1939).Google Scholar
  223. 220.
    Loughborough, D. L. and A. J. Stamm: Molecular properties of Lignin Solutions from Viscosity, Osmotic Pressure, Boiling Point Raising, Diffussion and Spreading Measurements. J. physic. Chem. 40, 1113 (1936).Google Scholar
  224. 221.
    Loughborough, D. L. and A. J. Stamm: The Molecular Properties of Lignin Solutions. J. physic. Chem. 45, 1137 (1941).Google Scholar
  225. 222.
    Lovell, E. L. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LII. New Method for the Fractionation of Lignin and Other Polymers. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 2070 (1941).Google Scholar
  226. 223.
    Lovin, R. J. and L. Friedman: The Catalytic Hydrogenation of Sulfonated Lignin. Pacific Pulp Paper Ind. 16, no. 7, 23 (1942).Google Scholar
  227. 224.
    Mac Gregor, W. S., T. H. Evans and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXVIII. Chromic Acid Oxidation of Lignin-type Substances. Wood Ethanolysis Products and Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 41 (1944).Google Scholar
  228. 225.
    Mac Innes, A. S., E. West, J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XLIX. Occurrence of the Guaiacyl and Syringyl Groupings in the Ethanolysis Products from Various Plants. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 62, 2803 (1940).Google Scholar
  229. 226.
    McCarthy, J. L.: The Chemical Structure of Lignin and of Wood; Current Knowledge. TAPPI, Empire State Section, 1939/40.Google Scholar
  230. 227.
    McNair, J. J. and E. C. Jahn: Properties of Lignin Esters. Paper Trade J. 117, no. 8, 29 (1943).Google Scholar
  231. 228.
    Mitchell, L., T. H. Evans and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXXI. Properties of 1-Bromo-1-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl). 2-propanone and Relation to Lignin Structure. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 604 (1944).Google Scholar
  232. 229.
    Mitchell, L. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXX. The Ethanolysis of 1-Acetoxy-1-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl).2-propanone and its Relation to Lignin Structure. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 66, 602 (1944).Google Scholar
  233. 230.
    Moerke, G. A.: Lignin Color Reactions with Amino Compounds. J. org. Chemistry 10, 42 (1945).Google Scholar
  234. 231.
    Mottet, A. L.: The Sulfonation of Western Hemlock Lignin. Pacific Pulp Paper Ind. 13, no. 10, 22 (1939).Google Scholar
  235. 232.
    Müller, A. u. H. Horvath: Die Phenylhydrindenstruktur des Diisoeugenol und Diisohomogenol (Bis-[propenylphenoläther]). III. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 76, 855 (1943).Google Scholar
  236. 233.
    Müller, O. A.: Lignin und Humin. Papierfabrikant 37, 237 (1939).Google Scholar
  237. 234.
    Nord, F. F. and J. C. Vitucci: On the Mechanism of Enzyme Action. XXX. The Formation of Methyl p-Methoxycinnamate by the Action of Lentinus lepideus on Glucose and Xylose. Arch. Biochem. 14, 243 (1947).Google Scholar
  238. 235.
    Nord, F. F. and J. C. Vitucci: On the Mechanism of Enzyme Action. XXXI. The Mechanism of Methyl p-Methoxycinnamate Formation by Lentinus lepideus and its Significance in Lignification. Arch. Biochem. 15, 465 (1947).Google Scholar
  239. 236.
    Ogait, A.: Über den Aufschluß von Fichtenholz mit Chloralhydrat und eine Chloralverbindung des Lignins. Cellulosechemie 22, 15 (1944).Google Scholar
  240. 237.
    Overbeck, W. u. H. F.Müller: Über die Hydrolyse verschiedener Hölzer mit Wasser unter Druck und die damit verbundene Veränderung der Holzbestandteile, insbesondere des Lignins. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 75, 547 (1947).Google Scholar
  241. 238.
    Pallmann, H.: Dispersoidchemische Probleme in der Humusforschung. Kolloid-Z. 101, 72 (1942).Google Scholar
  242. 239.
    Patterson, R. F. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXII. The Ultraviolet Absorption Spectra of Compounds Related to Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1862 (1943).Google Scholar
  243. 240.
    Patterson, R. F. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXIII. The Ultraviolet Absorption Spectra of Ethanol Lignins. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1869 (1943).Google Scholar
  244. 241.
    Patterson, R. F., K. A. West, E. L. Lovell, W. L. Hawkins and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LI. The Solvent Fractionation of Maple Ethanol Lignin. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 2065 (1941).Google Scholar
  245. 242.
    Pauly, H.: Gewinnung huminfreier Essigsäure-Lignole. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 76, 864 (1943).Google Scholar
  246. 243.
    Pauly, H.: Scheidung von Lignin-Komponenten. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 67, 1188 (1934).Google Scholar
  247. 244.
    Pearl, I. A.: 6-Chlorovanillin from the Chlorite Oxidation of Lignin. J. Amer, chem. Soc. 68, 916 (1946).Google Scholar
  248. 245.
    Pearl, I. A., A. Bailey and H. K. Benson: Studies on the Desulfonation of Calcium Lignosulfonate with Lime. Paper Trade J. 113, no. 17, 47 (1941).Google Scholar
  249. 246.
    Pearl, I. A. and H. K.Benson: Preparation of Desulfonated Lignin from. Calcium Lignosulfonate. Paper Trade J. 111, no. 19, 29 (1940).Google Scholar
  250. 247.
    Pedersen, J. H. and H. K. Benson: Chemical Derivatives of Lignin. Chlorolignin. Pacific Pulp Paper Ind. 14, 48 (1940).Google Scholar
  251. 248.
    Peniston, Q. P., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: The Reconversion of an “Extracted” Lignin into its Primary Building Units. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 530 (1939).Google Scholar
  252. 249.
    Peniston, Q. P., J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. L. Fractionation of Acetylated Cell Wall Constituents of Red Oak Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 62, 2284 (1940).Google Scholar
  253. 250.
    Pennington, D. and E. M.Ritter: Oxidation of Lignosulfonic Acids by Periodic Acid. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 68, 1391 (1946).Google Scholar
  254. 251.
    Pennington, D. and E. M.Ritter: A Diffusion Study of Lignin Sulfonic Acids in Sulfite Waste Liquor. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 69, 665 (1947).Google Scholar
  255. 252.
    Pepper, J. M.: Isolation and Utilization of Lignosulfonic Acids. Pulp Paper Mag. Canada 46, 83 (1945).Google Scholar
  256. 253.
    Pepper, J. M. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXXXVII. High Pressure Hydrogenation of Maple Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 70, 67 (1948).Google Scholar
  257. 254.
    Percival, E. G. V.: The Lignin Problem. Ann. Rep. Progr. Chem. 39, 142 (1943).Google Scholar
  258. 255.
    Perrenoud, H.: Zur Kenntnis der kolloidchemischen Eigenschaften des Humus. Dioxanextraktion und Dispersitätschemie des Fichtenlignins. Kolloid-Z. 107, 16 (1944).Google Scholar
  259. 256.
    Phillips, M.: Lignin as Constituent of Nitrogen-free Extract. J. Assoc. off. agric. Chemists 23, 108 (1940).Google Scholar
  260. 257.
    Phillips, M., M. J. Goss, B. L. Davis and H. Stevens: Composition of the Various Parts of the Oat Plant at Successive Stages of Growth, with Special Reference to the Formation of Lignin. J. agric. Res. 59, 319 (1939).Google Scholar
  261. 258.
    Ploetz, TH.: Über den enzymatischen Abbau polymerer Kohlehydrate. IV. Vergleichender enzymatischer Abbau einiger isolierter Holzbestandteile mit Schneckenferment. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 73, 57 (1940).Google Scholar
  262. 259.
    Ploetz, TH.: Über den enzymatischen Abbau polymerer Kohlehydrate. V. Enzymatischer Abbau einiger nativer ligninhaltiger Materialien. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 73, 61 (1940).Google Scholar
  263. 260.
    Ploetz, TH.: Über den Abbau enzymatischer polymerer Kohlehydrate. VI. Über den Bindungszustand des Lignins im Holz. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 73, 74 (1940).Google Scholar
  264. 261.
    Ploetz, TH.: Über den enzymatischen Abbau polymerer Kohlehydrate. VII. Weitere Fraktionierungsversuche an Lindenholz und enzymatischer Abbau der Fraktionen. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 73, 790 (1940).Google Scholar
  265. 262.
    Ploetz, TH.: Beiträge zur Ligninbestimmung mit starker Schwefelsäure. Cellulose-chemie 18, 49 (1940).Google Scholar
  266. 263.
    Plungian, M.: Meadol Lignin and its Use in Plastics. Sixth Annual Natl. Farm Chem. Conference, Chicago. 1940.Google Scholar
  267. 264.
    Plungian, M.: Preparation and Properties of Meadol, a Pure Alkali Lignin from Soda Black Liquor. Ind. Engng. Chem. 32, 1399 (1940).Google Scholar
  268. 265.
    Powter, N. B.: Canada Develops a New Form of Lignin. Mod. Plastics 24, 106 (1947).Google Scholar
  269. Powter, N. B.: Paper Ind. Paper Wld. 28, 1744 (1947).Google Scholar
  270. Powter, N. B.: Brit. Plast. mould. Prod. Trader 19, 215 (1947).Google Scholar
  271. 266.
    Pyle, J. J., L. Brickman and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XLIV. The Ethanolysis of Maple Wood; Separation and Identification of the Water-soluble Aldehyde Constituents. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 2198 (1939).Google Scholar
  272. 267.
    Racky, G.: Zur Kenntnis der Sulfitablauge. I. Papierfabrikant 39, 121 (1941).Google Scholar
  273. Racky, G.: II. Cellulosechemie 20, 22 (1942).Google Scholar
  274. 268.
    Refle, K.: Lignin als Rohmaterial. I. u. II. Chemiker-Ztg. 65, 267, 276 (1941).Google Scholar
  275. 269.
    Reid, E. E., H. Worthington and A. W. Larcher: The Action of Caustic Alkali and of Alkaline Salts on Alcohols. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 99 (1934).Google Scholar
  276. 270.
    Reid, J. D., E. C. Dryden and S. I. Aronovsky: Effect of Ethanolamine upon Corncob Lignin. A Preliminary Investigation. Paper Trade J. 113, no. 7, 27 (1941).Google Scholar
  277. 271.
    Richtzenhain, H.: Die Spaltung von Ätherbindungen mit Bisulfit und Thioglykolsäure. Modelle zur Chemie des Lignins. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 72, 2152 (1942).Google Scholar
  278. 272.
    Richtzenhain, H.: Vergleichende Oxydationsversuche an Vanillin und Lignin. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 75, 269 (1942).Google Scholar
  279. 273.
    Richtzenhain, H.: Enzymatische Versuche zur Entstehung des Lignins. II. Die Dehydrierung des 5-Methyl-pyrogallol-1,3-dimethyläthers. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 77, 409 (1944).Google Scholar
  280. 274.
    Ritchie, P. F. and C. B. Purves: Periodate Lignins; their Preparation and Properties. Pulp Paper Mag. Canada 48, no. 12, 74 (1947).Google Scholar
  281. 275.
    Ritter, D. M., D. E. Pennington, E. D. Olleman, K. A. Wright and T. F. Evans: Constitution of Gymnosperm Lignin. Science [New York] 107, 20 (1948).Google Scholar
  282. 276.
    Rüdiger, W.: Der Bau verholzter Membranen und ihr Verhalten in flüssigem Fluorwasserstoff. Papierfabrikant 38, 9 (1940).Google Scholar
  283. 277.
    Rupe, H., A. Ackermann U. H. Takagi: Die Reduktionsprodukte des Oxymethylencamphers. Helv. chim. Acta 1, 453 (1918).Google Scholar
  284. 278.
    Russell, A.: Interpretation of Lignin: the Synthesis of Gymnosperm Lignin. Science [New York] 106, 372 (1947).Google Scholar
  285. 279.
    Saeman, J. F. and E. E.Harris: Hydrogenation of Lignin over Raney Nickel. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 68, 2507 (1946).Google Scholar
  286. 280.
    Samuelson, O.: The Fractionation of Sulfite Waste Liquor. Svensk Papper-stidn. 45, 516 (1942).Google Scholar
  287. 281.
    Schenck, A.: The Nature of Lignosulfonic Acids Fractionated by Chemical and Physical Methods. Paper Trade J. 117, no. 14, 97 (1943).Google Scholar
  288. 282.
    Schmidt-Nielsen, S. u. J. Höye: Zur Kenntnis der Resistenz des Kiefern-Lignins. Svensk kern. Tidskr. 53, 287 (1941).Google Scholar
  289. 283.
    Schütz, FR.: Über den Aufschluß von Faserrohstoffen mit wasserhaltiger Monochloressigsäure. Cellulosechemie 18, 76 (1940).Google Scholar
  290. 284.
    Schütz, FR.: Untersuchung der beim Holzaufschluß mit wasserhaltiger Chloressigsäure entstehenden Lignins. Cellulosechemie 19, 87 (1941).Google Scholar
  291. 285.
    Schütz, FR.: Über den Aufschluß von Faserrohstoffen mit Chlorhydrinen. Cellulosechemie 19, 33 (1941).Google Scholar
  292. 286.
    Schütz, FR. u. W. Knackstedt: Holzaufschluß mit Salzsäure oder Chloriden als Katalysator in essigsaurer Lösung. Cellulosechemie 20, 15 (1942).Google Scholar
  293. 287.
    Schütz, FR. u. P. Sarten: Beiträge zur Holzchemie. Über die Bildung von Lignin aus Holz und Holzextrakten und die Oxydation der Zucker, der Cellulose, des Holzes und der Holzextrakte mit Diazoverbindungen zu Säuren der Zuckergruppe. Cellulosechemie 21, 35 (1943).Google Scholar
  294. 288.
    Schütz, FR. u. P. Sarten: Beiträge zur Holzchemie. II. Cellulosechemie 22, 1 (1944).Google Scholar
  295. 289.
    Schütz, FR. u. P. Sarten: Beiträge zur Holzchemie. II. (Nachtrag.) Über das optische Verhalten des Holzes und des Lignins. Cellulosechemie 22, 114 (1944).Google Scholar
  296. 290.
    Schütz, FR., P. Sarten U. H. Meyer: Beiträge zur Holzchemie. III. Weitere Versuche zur Ligninfrage und vollständigen Auflösung des Holzes. Holzforsch. 1, 2 (1947).Google Scholar
  297. 291.
    Schwabe, K. u. E. Hahn: Über ein neues Verfahren zur Fraktionierung von Ligninsulfonsäuren aus Sulfitablauge nach ihrer Molekülgröße. Holzforsch. 1, 42 (1947).Google Scholar
  298. 292.
    Schwabe, K. u. L. Hasner: Molekularbestimmung an Ligninsulfonsäuren durch Dialyse. Cellulosechemie 20, 61 (1942).Google Scholar
  299. 293.
    Schwartz, H.: The Utilization of Lignin in Plastics. Pulp Paper Mag. Canada 45, 675 (1944).Google Scholar
  300. 294.
    Seiberlich, J.: Fundamentals of Lignin Chemistry as Applied to Fertilizers. Northeast. Wood Util. Council, Bull. no. 7, 94 (1945).Google Scholar
  301. 295.
    Seiberlich, J.: Utilization of Lignin by Zinc Salt Treatment. Chem. Industries 56, 53 (1945).Google Scholar
  302. 296.
    Skraup, Z. H. u. J. König: Über Cellose, eine Biose aus Cellulose. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 34, 1115 (1901).Google Scholar
  303. 297.
    Shrikhande, J. G.: Estimation of Lignin in Tannin Materials. Biochemic. J. 34, 783 (1940).Google Scholar
  304. 298.
    Spencer, E. Y. and G. F. Wright: The Action of Diazomethane on Lactones and on Lignins. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 2017 (1941).Google Scholar
  305. 299.
    Steeves, W. H. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. XLII. The Isolation of a Bisulfite Soluble “Extracted Lignin”. J. Amer, chem. Soc. 61, 2194 (1939).Google Scholar
  306. 300.
    Sugii, Y.: The Constituents of the Bark of Mongolia officinalis RHED. et WILS. and Mongolia obovata THUMB. J. pharmac. Soc. Japan 50, 183 (1930).Google Scholar
  307. 301.
    Suida, H. u. Y. Prey: Über den Aufschluß von Säure-Lignin. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 74, 1916 (1941).Google Scholar
  308. 302.
    Suida, H. u. Y. Prey: Über den Aufschluß von Säure-Lignin. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 75, 1580 (1942).Google Scholar
  309. 303.
    Szent-Györgyi, A.: Über Zellatmung. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 72 A, 53 (1939).Google Scholar
  310. 304.
    Vanzetti, B. L.: Lignin and Resins. Atti V. Congr. Chim. appl. (II) 5, 932 (1936).Google Scholar
  311. 305.
    Virasoro, E.: Absorption Spectra of Lignin in the Ultraviolet. An. Asoc. quim. argent. 30, 54 (1942).Google Scholar
  312. 306.
    Virasoro, E.: Extraction of Lignin from White Quebracho Wood by Ethyl Acetoacetate and Phenol. An. Asoc. quim. argent. 30, 54 (1942).Google Scholar
  313. 307.
    Wacek, A. V.: Über die Synthese von Modellsubstanzen für die Ligninsulfonsäuren. III. Synthese von Veratrylaceton (3,4-Dimethoxy-phenyl-aceton) und Guajacylaceton (4-Oxy-3-methoxy-phenylaceton) und deren α-Sulfonsäuren. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 77, 85 (1944).Google Scholar
  314. 308.
    Wacek, A. V.: Der chemische Aufbau des Holzes. Experientia 2, 171 (1946).Google Scholar
  315. 309.
    Wacek, A. V. u. I. Horak: Über die Konstitution der synthetischen und durch Äthanolyse aus dem Holz isolierbaren Ketole vom Typus des Oxypropioguaiacons. Mh. Chem. 77, 18 (1947).Google Scholar
  316. 310.
    Wacek, A. V. u. K. Kratzl: Über Oxydation verschieden substituierter aliphatischer Seitenketten mit Natronlauge und Nitrobenzol. Äthanolysen-versuche an synthetischen Sulfonsäuren. Cellulosechemie 20, 108 (1942).Google Scholar
  317. 311.
    Wacek, A. V. u. K. Kratzl: Über die Oxydation verschieden substituierter aliphatischer Seitenketten in Modellsubstanzen für die Ligninbausteine mit Natronlauge und Nitrobenzol. II. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 76, 891 (1943).Google Scholar
  318. 312.
    Wacek, A. V. u. K. Kratzl: Über die Oxydation verschieden substituierter aliphatischer Seitenketten in Modellsubstanzen für die Ligninbausteine mit Natronlauge und Nitrobenzol. III. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 77, 516 (1944).Google Scholar
  319. 313.
    Wacek, A. V. u. K. Kratzl: Modellversuche zum Ligninproblem. Österr. Chemiker-Ztg. 48, 36 (1947).Google Scholar
  320. 314.
    Wacek, A. V., K. Kratzl U. A. V. Bézard: Über die Synthese von Modellsubstanzen für die Ligninsulfonsäuren. Synthese von α-Phenylaceton-α-sulfon-säure und Propioveratron-α-sulfonsäure. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 75, 1348 (1942).Google Scholar
  321. 315.
    Wacek, A. V. u. E. Nittner: Über das Vorkommen von substituierten Cumaronen im Buchenholzteer und deren Beziehung zum Lignin. Cellulose-chemie 18, 29 (1940).Google Scholar
  322. 316.
    Wacek, A. V. u. A. Schön: Untersuchungen zur Frage der Zusammensetzung von Baumrinden. Holz als Roh-u. Werkstoff 4, 18 (1941).Google Scholar
  323. 317.
    Wagner, K.: Die Verwertung des Lignins. Vierjahresplan 5, 924 (1941).Google Scholar
  324. Wagner, K.: Wbl. Papierfabrikat. 73, 341 (1942).Google Scholar
  325. 318.
    Wald, W. J., P. F. Ritchie and C. B. Purves: The Elementary Composition of Lignin in Northern Pine and Black Spruce Woods and of the Isolated Klason and Periodate Lignins. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 69, 1371 (1947).Google Scholar
  326. 319.
    Wedekind, E.: Aufschluß der Holzarten durch organische Lösungsmittel: die Lignindarstellung als Vorlesungsexperiment. Forstarch. 11, 53 (1935).Google Scholar
  327. 320.
    West, K. A., W. L. Hawkins and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LV. Synthesis and Properties of β-Hydroxypropioveratrone. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3035 (1941).Google Scholar
  328. 321.
    West, K. A., W. L. Hawkins and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LVI. Stability of Lignin Building Units and Ethanol Lignin Fractions toward Ethanolic Hydrogen Chloride. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 63, 3038 (1941).Google Scholar
  329. 322.
    West, K. A. and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXIV. Synthesis and Properties of 3-Hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl).1-propanone. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1170 (1943).Google Scholar
  330. 323.
    West, E., W. S. Mac Gregor, T. H. Evans, I. Levi and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXVI. The Ethanolysis of Maple Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1176 (1943).Google Scholar
  331. 324.
    West, E., A. S. Macinnes and H. Hibbert: Studies on Lignin and Related Compounds. LXIX. Isolation of 1-(4-Hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl).2-propanone and 1-Ethoxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl).2-propanone from the Ethanolysis of Spruce Wood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 65, 1187 (1943).Google Scholar
  332. 325.
    West, E., A. S. Mac Innes, J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Occurrence of the Syringyl Radical in Plant Products. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 2556 (1939).Google Scholar
  333. 326.
    White, E. V., J. N. Swartz, Q. P. Peniston, H. Schwartz, J. L. McCarthy and H. Hibbert: Mechanism of the Chlorination of Lignin. Techn. Assoc. Pap. 24, 179 (1941).Google Scholar
  334. 327.
    Wiechert, K.: Darstellung und Eigenschaften des Rotbuchenlignins. Papierfabrikant 37, 325, 339 (1939).Google Scholar
  335. 328.
    Wiechert, K.: Über die Ligninfarbreaktionen des Rotbuchenholzes. Papierfabrikant 37, 17, 30 (1939).Google Scholar
  336. 329.
    Wiechert, K.: Eine neue Methode zur Bestimmung des Ligningehaltes von Holz und Papier mittels wasserfreiem Fluorwasserstoff. Cellulosechemie 18, 57 (1940).Google Scholar
  337. 330.
    Wiechert, K.: Neuere Methoden der präparativen organischen Chemie. II. Verwendung von Fluorwasserstoff für organisch-chemische Reaktionen. Die Chemie 56, 333 (1943).Google Scholar
  338. 331.
    Wise, L. E. and E. K. Ratliff: Summary Analysis of Quebracho Wood. Trop. Woods 91, 40 (1947).Google Scholar
  339. 332.
    Yorston, F. H.: Recent Advances in Chemistry of Wood. Pulp Paper. Mag. Canada 46, 276, 278, 280 (1945).Google Scholar
  340. 333.
    Zechmeister, L. u. G. Töth: Zur Kenntnis der Hydrolyse von Cellulose und der dabei auftretenden Zwischenprodukte. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 64, 854 (1931).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag in Vienna 1948

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. E. Brauns
    • 1
  1. 1.AppletonUSA

Personalised recommendations