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Abstract

It is known that enzymes in living cells are capable of synthesizing complex carbohydrates from monosaccharides such as glucose or fructose. Numerous polysaccharides among which cellulose, pectin or gums and oligosaccharides which include sucrose, trehalose, raffinose are thus produced by plants; glycogen, mucoproteins and lactose are synthesized by animals. A great number and variety of diverse polysaccharides are also synthesized by bacteria and fungi. It is of interest that the bacterium, Acetobacter xylinum, when grown with hexoses, sugar alcohols, or glycerol produces a polysaccharide consisting of D-glucose joined by 1,4-β-glucosidic linkages identical with plant cellulose (2). Various species of Leuconostoc also produce polysaccharides consisting of D-glucose units, but these differ structurally from cellulose in that the glucose units are mutually joined through 1,6-α-glucosidic linkages (26, 73, 20, 37).

Keywords

Glycosidic Linkage Sodium Periodate Invert Sugar Hexose Phosphate Acetobacter Xylinum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag in Vienna 1948

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Z. Hassid
    • 1
  • M. Doudoroff
    • 1
  1. 1.BerkeleyUSA

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