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Abstract

The chemical unsaturation of carotenoids renders these biochromes particularly susceptible to degradation with bleaching by atmospheric oxygen and other oxidizing agents, augmented by light of certain wave lengths and by elevated temperatures. In the terrestrial world direct sunlight, wide changes of temperature, relatively high oxygen tension and desiccation are therefore effective factors in the rapid destruction of carotenoids, e. g., in fallen leaves, dying organisms, soils and the feces of herbivorous animals.

Keywords

Digestive Gland Marine Animal Beach Sand Carotenoid Pigment Biochemical Aspect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag in Vienna 1948

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. L. Fox
    • 1
  1. 1.La JollaUSA

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