Advertisement

Abstract

Ergot occupies a special position among the drugs of our therapeutic armamentarium, not only on account of its unusual classification in the vegetable kingdom but also because of its interesting biological characteristics and the remarkable nature of its active principles. Known botanically as Claviceps purpurea, ergot is a parasitic filamentous fungus which grows on the ears of plants of the Gramineae family. It is found principally on cereals, and thrives best on the ears of rye. Ergot of rye, or Secale cornutum, is the officinal form of the pharmacopoeias and the starting material for pharmaceutical preparations.

Keywords

Ergot Alkaloid Acid Hydrazide Amino Alcohol Peptide Residue Asymmetric Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Akabori, S.: Synthese von Imidazol-Derivaten aus a-Aminosäuren. I. Mitt. Eine neue Synthese von Desaminohistidin und ein Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Konstitution des Ergothioneins. Ber. dtsch. chervil. Ges. 66, 151 (1933)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Barger, G.: Ergot and Ergotism. London: Gurney & Jackson. 1931.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Barger, G.: Isolation and Synthesis of p-Hydroxyphenyl-ethylamine, an Active Principle of Ergot Soluble in Water. J. chem. Soc. (London), Trans. 95, 1125 (1909).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Barger, G.: The Alkaloids of Ergot. In: Handbuch der experimentellen Pharmakologie, Ergänz.-Werk, Bd. VI, S. 84, 222. 1938.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Barger, G. and F. H. Carr: The Alkaloids of Ergot. J. chem. Soc. (London), Trans. 91, 337 (1907).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Barger, G. and H. H. Dale: Ergotoxine and some other Constituents of Ergot. Biochemic. J. 2, 240 (1907).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Barger, G. and H. H. Dale: The Water-Soluble Active Principle of Ergot. J. Physiol., Proc. Physiol. Soc. 38, LXXVII (1909).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Barger, G. and H. H. Dale: 4-ß-Aminoethylglyoxaline (ß-Iminazolylethylamine) and the other Active Principles of Ergot. J. chem. Soc. (London), Trans. 97, 2592 (1910).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Barger, G. and A. J. Ewins: The Alkaloids of Ergot. II. J. chem. Soc. (London), Trans. 97, 284 (1910)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Barger, G. and A. J. Ewins: The Constitution of Ergothioneine: a Betaine Related to Histidine. J. chem. Soc. (London), Trans. 99, 2336 (1911).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Barger, G. and G. S. Walpole: Further Syntheses of p-Hydroxyphenylethylamine. J. chem. Soc. (London), Trans. 95, 1720 (1909).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Beere, J. A.: A Note on the Determination of Ergothioneine in Blood Filtrates. Biochemic. J. 26, 458 (1932).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Bergmann, M., D. Delis: Umwandlung von a-Amino-ß-oxysäuren in a.-Ketosäuren. Verwandlung ihrer Hydantoine in Ketosäuren und Harnstoffe. Liebigs Ann. Chem. 458, 76 (1927).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Bergmann, M., A. Miekeley: Neue desmotrope Aminosäureanhydride vom Piperazintypus. Zur Kenntnis des Abbaues der Arninosäuren. Serin als Dehydrierungsmittel. Liebigs Ann. Chem. 458, 40 (1927).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Bergmann, M. and C. Niemann: The Chemistry of Amino Acids and Proteins. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 7, 99 (1938).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Bragg, W. L.: Patterson Diagrams in Crystal Analysis. Nature (London) 143, 73 (1939)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Chassar Moir, J.: The Action of Ergot Preparations on the Puerperal Uterus. Brit. Med. J. 1932, 1119, part I.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    “Chinoin” Act. Ges. u. E. Wolf: Swiss Patent 160898.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Craig, L. C., T. Shedlovsky, R. G. Gould Jr. and W. A. Jacobs: The Ergot Alkaloids. XIV. The Positions of the Double Bond and the Carboxyl Group in Lysergic Acid and its Isomer. The Structure of the Alkaloids. J. biol. Chemistry 125, 289 (1938).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Dilsls, O., A. Pillow: Über Bis-benzoylcyanid. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 41, 1893 (1908).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Dudley, H. W. and J. Chassar Moir: The Substance Responsible for the Traditional Clinical Effect of Ergot. Brit. Med. J. 1935, 520, part I.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Eagles, B. A.: Biochemistry of Sulfur. II. The Isolation of Ergothioneine from Ergot of Rye. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 50, 1386 (1928).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Eagles, B. A. and T. B. Johnson: The Biochemistry of Sulfur. I. The Identity of Ergothioneine from Ergot of Rye with Sympectothion and Thiasine from Pigs’ Blood. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 49, 575 (1927)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Engeland, R., F.R. Kutscher: Ober eine zweite wirksame Secalebase. Zbl. Physiol. 24, 479 (1910).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Engeland, R., F.R. Kutscher: Ober einige Bestandteile des Extractum Secalis cornuti. Zbl. Physiol. 24, 589 (1910).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Ewins, A. J.: Acetylcholine, a New Active Principle of Ergot. Biochemic. J. 8, 44 (1914).Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Ewins, A. J.: Some New Physiologically Active Derivatives of Choline. Biochemic. J. 8, 366 (1914).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Fränkel, S., J. Rainer: fiber das Vorkommen von cyklischen Aminosäuren im Secale cornutum. Biochem. Z. 74, 167 (1916).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Gould, R. G. Jr. and W. A. Jacobs: The Synthesis of Certain Substituted Quinolines and 5,6-Benzoquinolines. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 2890 (1939).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Harington, C. R. and J. Overhoff: A New Synthesis of 2-Thiolhistidine together with Experiments towards the Synthesis of Ergothioneine. Biochemic. J. 27, 338 (1933)Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Haurowitz, F.: Die Anordnung der Peptidketten in Sphäroprotein-Molekülen. Hoppe-Seyler’s Z. physiol. Chem. 256, 28 (1938).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Hunter, G.: A New Test for Ergothioneine upon which is Based a Method for its Estimation in Simple Solution and in Blood-Filtrates. Biochemic. J. 22, 4 (1928).Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Jacobs, W. A.: The Ergot Alkaloids. I. The Oxidation of Ergotinine. J. biol. Chemistry 97, 739 (1932).Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. II. The Degradation of Ergotinine with Alkali. Lysergic Acid. J. biol. Chemistry 104, 547 (1934)Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. IV. The Cleavage of Ergotinine with Sodium and Butyl Alcohol. J. biol. Chemistry 108, 595 (1935)Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. V. The Hydrolysis of Ergotinine. J. biol. Chemistry 110, 521 (1935).Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. VI. Lysergic Acid. J. biol. Chemistry. 11, 455 (1935)Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: On an Alkaloid from Ergot. Science (New York) 82, 16 (1935)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. The Structure of Lysergic Acid. Science (New York) 83, 38 (1936).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. IX. The Structure of Lysergic Acid. J. biol. Chemistry 113, 767 (1936).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. X. On Ergotamine and Ergoclavine. J. org. Chemistry, 1, 245 (1936/37).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. XI. Isomeric Dihydrolysergic Acids and the Structure of Lysergic. Acid. J. biol. Chemistry 115, 227 (1936).Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. XIII. The Precursors of Pyruvic and Isobutyrylformic Acids. J. biol. Chemistry 122, 419 (1937/38).Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Jacobs, W. A. and L. C. Craig: The Ergot Alkaloids. XVII. The Dimethylindole from Dihydrolysergic Acid. J. biol Chemistry 128, 715 (1939).Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Kharasch, M. S.:, S. Patent 2086559.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Kharasch, M. S., H. King, A. Stoll, M. R. Thompson: Das neue Mutterkornalkaloid. Schweiz. med. Wschr. 66, 262 (1936).Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Kharasch, M. S. and R. R. Legault: Ergotncin. Science (New York) 81, 388 (1935)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. 48.
    Kharasch, M. S. and R. R. Legault: The New Active Principle(s) of Ergot. Science (New York) 82, 614 (1935)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    Kobert, R.: Zur Geschichte des Mutterkorns. In: Hist. Stud. pharmak. Inst. Kaiserl. Univ. Dorpat I, i (1889).Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    Kobert, R.: Über die Bestandteile und Wirkungen des Mutterkorns. Naunyn-Schmiedebergs, Arch. exp. Pathol. Pharmakol. 316 (1884).Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    Kofler, A., L. Kofler: Über zusammengesetzte Mutterkornalkaloide. Z. angew. Chem. 50, 620 (1937).Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    Kossel, A.: Über das Agmatin. Hoppe-Seyler’s, Z. physiol. Chem. 66, 257 (1910).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. 53.
    Kossel, A.: Synthese des Agmatins. Hoppe-Seyler’s, Z. physiol. Chem. 68, 170 (1910).Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    Kraft, F.: Über das Mutterkorn. Arch. Pharmaz. Ber. dtsch. pharmaz Ges. 244. 336 (1906).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. 55.
    Kuhn, R., H. Roth: Mikrobestimmung von Acetyl-, Benzoyl-und C-Methylgruppen. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 66, 1274 (1933).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    Kiissner, W.: Über ein nues spezifisches Alkaloid des Mutterkorns. Mercks Jahresber. 47, 5 (1933)Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Kutscher, F.R.: Die physiologische Wirkung einer Secalebase und des Imidazolyl-äthylamins. Zbl. Physiol. 24, 163 (1910).Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    Mellanby, E., E. Surie and D. C. Harrison: Vitamin D in Ergot of Rye. Biochemic. J. 23, 710 (1929).Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Newton, E. B., S. R. Benedict and H. D. Dakin: On Thiasine, its Structure and Identification with Ergothioneine. J. biol. Chemistry 72, 367 (1927).Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    Patterson, A. M. and L. T. Capell: The Ring Index. New York: Reinhold Pubi. Corp. 1940.Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    Pauling, L. and C. Niemann: The Structure of Proteins. J. Amer. chem. Soc. 61, 1860 (1939).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. 62.
    Pirie, N. W.: Improved Methods for the Isolation of Methionine and Ergothioneine. Biochemic. J. 27, 202 (1933)Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    Pyman, F. L.: A New Synthesis of 4- (or 5-)ß-Aminoethyl-glyoxaline, one of the Active Principles of Ergot. J. chem. Soc. (London), Trans. 99, 668 (1911)Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    Smith, S. and G. M. Timmis: The Alkaloids of Ergot. II. Ergotinine and y,-Ergotinine. J. chem. Soc. ( London ) 1931, 1888.Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    Smith, S. and G. M. Timmis: The Alkaloids of Ergot. III. Ergine, a New Base Obtained by the Degradation of Ergotoxine and Ergotinine. J. chem. Soc. ( London ) 1932, 763.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    Smith, S. and G. M. Timmis: The Alkaloids of Ergot. IV. A Complex Group Common to Ergotoxine and Ergotamine. J. chem. Soc. ( London ) 1932, 1543.Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    Smith, S. and G. M. Timmis: The Alkaloids of Ergot. V. The Nature of Ergine. J. chem. Soc. ( London ) 1934, 674.Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    Smith, S. and G. M. Timmis: The Alkaloids of Ergot. VII. /so-Ergine and iso-Lysergic Acids. J. chem. Soc. ( London ) 1936, 1440.Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    Smith, S. and G. M. Timmis: The Alkaloids of Ergot. VIII. New Alkaloids of Ergot: Ergosine and Ergosinine. J. chem. Soc. ( London ) 1937, 396.Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    Stearns, J.: Account of the Pulvis Parturiens, a Remedy for Quickening Childbirth. Med. Reposit. New York 5, 308 (1838).Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    Stoll, A.: Zur Kenntnis der Mutterkornalkaloide Compt. rend. Soc. Suisse Sci. nat., Neuchâtel 1920, 190.Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    Stoll, A.: Über die wirksamen Substanzen des Mutterkorns. Schweiz. med. Wschr. 51, 525 (1921).Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    Stolz, A.: Altes und Neues über Mutterkorn. Mitt. Naturforsch.-Ges. Bern, 45, 53, 1942.Google Scholar
  74. 74.
    Stolz, A.: Über Ergotamin. Helv. chim. Acta 28, 1283 (1945)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. 75.
    Stolz, A.: Swiss Patent 79879 (1918); German Patent 357272 (1922).Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    Stoll, A., E. Burckhardt: L’ergobasine, un nouvel alcaloïde de l’ergot de Seigle, soluble dans l’eau. C. R. hebd. Séances Acad. Sci.. 210, 1680 (1935).Google Scholar
  77. 77.
    Stoll, A., E. Burckhardt, Lergobasine un nouvel alcaloïde de l’ergot de seigle, soluble dans l’eau. Bull. Sci. pharmacol. 42, 257 (1935).Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    Stoll, A., E. Burckhardt, Ergocristin und Ergocristinin, ein neues Alkaloidpaar aus Mutterkorn. (Vorl. Mitt.) Hoppe-Seyler’s Z. physiol. Chem. 250, 1 (1937).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. 79.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann: Racemische Lysergsäure und ihre Auflösung in die optischen Antipoden. 2. vorl. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. HoppeSeyler’s Z. physiol. Chem. 250, 7 (1937).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. 80.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann: Partialsynthese des Ergobasins, eines natürlichen Mutterkornalkaloids sowie seines optischen Antipoden. 3. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. HoppeSeyler’s Z. physiol. Chem. 251, 155 (1938).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. 81.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann: Die optisch aktiven Hydrazide der Lysergsäure und der Isolysergsäure. 4. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Helv. chim Acta 26, 922 (1943).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. 82.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann: Partialsynthese von Alkaloiden vom Typus des Ergobasins. 6. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Heiv. chim Acta 26, 944 (1943)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. 83.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann: Die Alkaloide der Ergotoxingruppe: Ergocristin, Ergokryptin und Ergocornin. 7. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. HeIv. chim. Acta 26, 1570 (1943)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. 84.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann: Die Dihydroderivate der natürlichen linksdrehenden Mutterkorn-, alkaloide. 9. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Helv. chim Acta 26, 2070 (1943)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. 85.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann: Zur Kenntnis des Polypeptidteils der Mutterkornalkaloide. II. (Partielle alkalische Hydrolyse der Mutterkornalkaloide.) 20. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Rely. chim. Acta 33, 1705 (1950).Google Scholar
  86. 86.
    Stolz, A., A. Hofmann, B. Becker: Die Spaltstücke von Ergocristin, Ergokryptin und Ergocornin. 8. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Helv. chien. Acta 26, 1602 (1943)Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann, E. Jucker, T. Petrzilka, J. Rutschmann, F. Troxler: Peptide der isomeren Lysergsäuren und Dihydro-lysergsäuren. 18. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Heiv. chim. Acta 33, 108 (1950).Google Scholar
  88. 88.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann, T. Petrzilka: Die Dihydroderivate der rechtsdrehenden Mutterkornalkaloide. ri. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Rely. chim. Acta 29, 635 (1946).Google Scholar
  89. 89.
    Stoll, A., A. Hofmann, T. Petrzilka: Die Konstitution der Mutterkornalkaloide. Struktur des Peptidteils. III. 24. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Helv. chim Acta 34, 1544 (1951)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. 90.
    Stolz, A., A. Hofmann, F. Troxler: Über die Isomerie von Lysergsäure und Isolysergsäure. 14. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. HeIv. chim. Acta 32, 506 (1949)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. 91.
    Stoll, A., T. Petrzilka, B. Becker: Beitrag Zur Kenntnis des Polypeptidteils von Mutterkornalkaloiden. (Spaltung der Mutterkornalkaloide mit Hydrazin.) 16. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. Heiv. chim. Acta 33, 57 (1950)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. 92.
    Stolz, A., J. Rutschmann, W. Schlientz: Synthese der optisch-aktiven Dihydro-lysergsäuren. 19. Mitt. über Mutterkornalkaloide. HeIv. chim. Acta 33, 375 (1950)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. 93.
    Tanret, C.: Sur la présence d’un nouvel alcaloide, l’ergotinine, dans le seigle ergoté. C. R. hebd. Séances Acad. Sci. 81, 896 (1875).Google Scholar
  94. 94.
    Tanret, C.: Sur un nouveau principe immédiat de l’ergot de seigle, l’ergostérine. J. Pharmac. Chim. (V) 19, 225 (1889).Google Scholar
  95. 95.
    Tanret, C.: Sur l’ergostérine, la fongistérine. C. R. hebd. Séances Acad. Sci. i47, 75 (1908)Google Scholar
  96. 96.
    Tanret, C.: Sur une base nouvelle retirée du seigle ergoté, l’ergothionéine. C. R. hebd. Séances Acad. Sci. 149. 222 (1909).Google Scholar
  97. 97.
    Thompson, M. R.: A New Active Principle of Ergot. Science (New York) 81, 636 (1935).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. 98.
    Uhle, F. C. and W. A. Jacoss: The Ergot Alkaloids. XX. The Synthesis of Dihydro-dl-lysergic Acid. A New Synthesis of 3- Substituted Quinolines. J. org. Chemistry, 20, 76 (1945)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. 99.
    Vahlen, E.: Glavin, ein neuer Mutterkornbestandteil. Naunyn-Schmiedebergs Arch. exp. Pathol. Pharmakol. 55, 131 (1906).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. 100.
    Vahlen, E.: Über Mutterkorn. Naunyn-Schmiedebergs Arch. exp. Pathol. Pharmakol. 60, 42 (1909).Google Scholar
  101. 101.
    Vauquelin, L. N.: Analyse du seigle ergoté du Bois de Boulogne près Paris. Ann. Chim. Phys. 3, 337 (1816).Google Scholar
  102. 102.
    Windaus, A., H. Opitz: Synthese einiger Imidazol-Derivate. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 44, 1721 (1911).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. 103.
    Windaus, A., W. Vogt: Synthese des Imidazolyl-ä,thylamins. Ber. dtsch. chem. Ges. 40, 3691 (1907)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. 104.
    Wrinch, D. M.: The Pattern of Proteins. Nature (London) 137, 411 (1936).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. 105.
    Wrinch, D. M.: Energy of Formation of “Cyclol” Molecules. Nature (London) 138, 241 (1936).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Wien · Springer-Verlag 1952

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Stoll
    • 1
  1. 1.BasleSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations