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Abstract

Podophyllum is the dried roots and rhizomes of species of Podophyllum (Fam. Berberidaceae). It is derived commercially from two species of plants, namely, Podophyllum peltatum L., the American species, and P. emodi Wall. (P. hexandrum Royle), the Indian. Both are herbaceous perennials. The species do not have an ancient history compared with that of many other medicinal plants. P. peltatum is indigenous to the United States and Canada and grows commonly in eastern North America from Quebec through Florida and westward to Minnesota and Texas. It is usually called in the United States “May apple” or “American mandrake”; older names are “Indian apple”, “wild lemon”, “duck’s foot”, “vegetable calomel”, etc.

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Copyright information

© Wien · Springer-Verlag 1958

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Hartwell
    • 1
  • A. W. Schrecker
    • 1
  1. 1.BethesdaUSA

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