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Abstract

The seaweeds, that is, the macroscopic marine algae, consist of a group of photosynthetic plants, in which it is believed that evolution has not proceeded as far as in land plants. In general, the morphology of algae is much simpler than that of land plants. There is a more limited diversification of cells according to function and, indeed, many unicellular algae are known which are related botanically to the seaweeds. Insofar as the metabolism of the algae has been studied, it appears to resemble in many respects that of land plants, although the metabolic end-products may differ (44).

Keywords

Green Alga Land Plant Brown Alga Marine Alga Uronic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1965

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley Peat
    • 1
  • J. R. Turvey
    • 1
  1. 1.BangorAustralia

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