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Plastid Transformation: A Progress Report

  • M. J. Cornelissen
  • M. De Block
  • M. Van Montagu
  • J. Leemans
  • P. H. Schreier
  • J. Schell
Part of the Plant Gene Research book series (GENE)

Abstract

Reproducible methods, allowing the introduction of defined DNA fragments in the plant nuclear genome, are presently available (see previous chapters in this volume) and are contributing significantly to the experimental analysis of the gene structure-function relationships governing regulated gene-expression in plants.

Keywords

Plastid Genome NPTII Gene Selectable Marker Gene Plastid Gene Chloramphenicol Acetyl Transferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Cornelissen
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. De Block
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Van Montagu
    • 1
  • J. Leemans
    • 2
  • P. H. Schreier
    • 3
  • J. Schell
    • 3
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratorium voor GenetikaRijksuniversiteit GentGentBelgium
  2. 2.Plant Genetic SystemsGentBelgium
  3. 3.Max-Planck-Institut für ZüchtungsforschungFederal Republic of Germany

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