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Pain pp 136-146 | Cite as

Hindu Philosophy on Pain: an Outline

  • Sunil Kumar Krishnalal Pandya
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica Supplementum book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 38)

Abstract

The four holy books termed the vedas form the fountainhead of Hindu philosophy. Their origins are lost in the mists of antiquity. Legend claims for them a divine origin. Brahma, the creator carried the vedas within himself. Once, exhausted, as he drifted off to sleep, the vedas slipped out of his mouth. Hayagriva, the horse-faced demon, seeing his chance, made off with them. Fortunately Vishnu, the preserver, caught Hayagriva in the act and assuming the form of a fish (matsya avatar) followed Hayagriva into his oceanic home and rescued the vedas for mankind (Fig. 1).

Keywords

Indian National Science Academy Buddhist Philosophy Mental Suffering Neurophysiological Aspect Divine Origin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sunil Kumar Krishnalal Pandya
    • 1
  1. 1.Seth GS Medical CollegeKing Edward Memorial HospitalBombayIndia

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