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Pain pp 111-113 | Cite as

Psychological Therapy of Pain

  • Anita Violon
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica Supplementum book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 38)

Abstract

In the beginning I want to make a general remark: sometimes it is suggested that pain could have some educative value. Let me say, as a psychologist who has worked for more than 15 years with pain patients, that I have never encountered this supposed pain virtue. Moreover, this sort of assumption could be dangerous. Compassion with suffering persons indeed and attemps to relieve their pain are rather new and honourable medical trends. It would be premature to deny these symptomatic treatments their value. Please keep in mind that watching other persons suffering may have a fascinating, although unconscious, power of attraction. Moreover, you are here a group of physicians selected for their humanistic qualities and wanting to relieve pain and suffering. Outside of you, the most powerful interest has always been in pain-provoking rather than in pain-relieving methods, for several purposes, noteworthy political and religious. I of course speak of torture. This is the reason why I propose that the necessity of relieving pain should be considered so evident that it ought to be a taboo to doubt it.

Keywords

Chronic Pain Pain Patient Cognitive Therapy Chronic Pain Patient Psychological Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anita Violon
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurological DepartmentHopital Saint-PierreBruxellesBelgium

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