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Studying Young Stutterers’ Speech Productions: a Procedural Challenge

  • Edward G. Conture

Abstract

There are many things researchers would like to know about young stutterers’ speech behavior but are afraid to ask. Actually, that statement is not exactly correct. Most researchers are not as much afraid to ask the question as they may be to seek the answer. In this chapter, a variety of issues and concerns will be addressed which relate to the objective study of young stutterers’ speech production. These youngsters’ participation in speech research will be discussed in terms of three different but related topics: (1) Behavioral and Subject Definitions/Specifications; (2) Methodological and Procedural Issues and (3) Instrumental Considerations.

Keywords

Speech Production Voice Onset Time Hearing Research Inverse Filter Fluent Speech 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Edward G. Conture

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