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Coarticulation and Stuttering: an Acoustic and Electropalatographic Study

  • Jonathan Harrington

Abstract

In Van Riper (1982) a claim is made that the production of a disfluency is phonetically dissimilar to the onset of fluent production of the target syllable [1], For example, a stuttering disfluency in the context of [kheitl] (Katy) might be [kh] [kh] [kh] (orthographically represented by Van Riper (1982: 435) as “kuh” “kuh” “kuh”) rather than \( {\mathop{k}\limits_{ + }^h}e\quad {\mathop{k}\limits_{ + }^h}e\quad {\mathop{k}\limits_{ + }^h}e \). Van Riper (1982: 415) explains this phenomenon as a disorder of timing’, and suggests that the presence of the perceived schwa in syllabic repetitions may be due to a failure in coarticulation. The most explicit statement of the implications of a ‘failure in coarticulation’ and the ‘presence of the perceived schwa’ for the realisation of the disfluency are made in Van Riper (1973):

On words beginning with an “h”such as “he” the stutterer will at first realise that his mouth is shaped for the schwa vowel. (Van Riper, 1973: 329–330).

Keywords

Acoustical Society Acoustic Analysis Glottal Stop Target Syllable Oral Shaping 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Harrington

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